HIST11037 - Ancient & Medieval Civilisations: An Introduction
Term 1 - 2017


All details in this unit profile for HIST11037 have been officially approved by CQUniversity and represent a learning partnership between the University and you (our student). The information will not be changed unless absolutely necessary and any change will be clearly indicated by an approved correction included in the profile.

Overview

Ancient & Medieval Civilisations: An Introduction provides an overview of world history to 1400CE. It examines the first civilisations and rise of empires to 500CE and new patterns of civilisation between 500 and 1400CE. Areas of study include the Ancient Middle East, Egypt, India, China, Greece, Rome, the Islamic world, Byzantium, Africa, Japan, Korea, Meso-America and Europe to the Late Middle Ages. Students will be introduced to the political, economic, social and cultural aspects of each civilisation and the historical interactions between them. As an introductory level offering, the unit also introduces students to a preliminary understanding of the problems of historical evidence and emphasises both discipline-specific and generic skills. Students will require computer and internet access to complete some assessment for this unit. Together with the optional sequel, The Modern World Emerges: An Historical Overview, Ancient and Medieval Civilisations provides a firm foundation for more specialised history studies offered at CQU.

Details

Career Level Undergraduate
Unit Level Level 1
Credit Points 6
Student Contribution Band 1
Fraction of Full-Time Student Load 0.125

Attendance Requirements

All on-campus students are expected to attend scheduled classes – in some units, these classes are identified as a mandatory (pass/fail) component and attendance is compulsory. International students, on a student visa, must maintain a full time study load and meet both attendance and academic progress requirements in each study period (satisfactory attendance for International students is defined as maintaining at least an 80% attendance record).

Offerings

Term 1 - 2017
  • Distance
  • Rockhampton

Website

This unit has a website, within the Moodle system, which is available two weeks before the start of term. It is important that you visit your Moodle site throughout the term. Go to Moodle

Recommended Student Time Commitment

Each 6-credit Undergraduate unit at CQUniversity requires an overall time commitment of an average of 12.5 hours of study per week, making a total of 150 hours for the unit.

Class Timetable

Assessment Overview

Assessment Task Weighting
1. Written Assessment 30%
2. Practical and Written Assessment 40%
3. Online Quiz(zes) 30%

This is a graded unit: your overall grade will be calculated from the marks or grades for each assessment task, based on the relative weightings shown in the table above. You must obtain an overall mark for the unit of at least 50%, or an overall grade of ‘pass’ in order to pass the unit. If any ‘pass/fail’ tasks are shown in the table above they must also be completed successfully (‘pass’ grade). You must also meet any minimum mark requirements specified for a particular assessment task, as detailed in the ‘assessment task’ section (note that in some instances, the minimum mark for a task may be greater than 50%). Consult the University’s Grades and Results Procedures for more details of interim results and final grades.

All University policies are available on the IMPortal.

You may wish to view these policies:

  • Grades and Results Procedure
  • Assessment Policy and Procedure (Higher Education Coursework)
  • Review of Grade Procedure
  • Academic Misconduct Procedure
  • Monitoring Academic Progress (MAP) Policy and Procedure – Domestic Students
  • Monitoring Academic Progress (MAP) Policy and Procedure – International Students
  • Refund and Excess Payments (Credit Balances) Policy and Procedure
  • Student Feedback – Compliments and Complaints Policy and Procedure
  • Acceptable Use of Information and Communications Technology Facilities and Devices Policy and Procedure

This list is not an exhaustive list of all University policies. The full list of University policies are available on the IMPortal.

Feedback, Recommendations and Responses

Every unit is reviewed for enhancement each year. At the most recent review, the following staff and student feedback items were identified and recommendations were made.

Feedback Source Recommendation
Aspects of the course commented upon favourably were interesting and informative audio-lectures, together with personalisation of lectures with the inclusion of the lecturer's own photographs of historic features; lecturer support with academic and other problems; wide choice of essay topics; detailed assessment feedback given; and uncomplicated Moodle layout. Student emails and course evaluations. Continue with the present course structure and presentation, as well as level of support and feedback.
Amount of reading required each week. Some students felt this was excessive with the Study Guide, Textbook, Course Resources Online readings and other links in Moodle. Course evaluation, student emails and class discussion. Greater clarify provided for students and remind more frequently that CRO reading is only required for the two essay questions and is not required for each week/topic. Other resources provided in Moodle are optional; they are for extended interest only but may be useful for essays.
On successful completion of this unit, you will be able to:
  1. demonstrate a broad knowledge of the political, economic, social and cultural history of major world civilisations and their interactions from pre-history to 1400CE (AD1400).
  2. demonstrate an unprejudiced understanding of the differing worldviews of these civilisations and an acceptance of others' informed opinions.
  3. demonstrate an understanding of the key historical problems of the period and be able to present evidence-backed solutions to these problems.
  4. demonstrate the following skills: i. the ability to explain the significance of historical events and processes relevant to the period; ii. the ability to critique historical interpretations and their applications to contemporary global issues; iii. the ability to understand and use the principle that ethical action and social responsibility are inherent in the study of history and its interpretations; iv. the ability to locate, retrieve, organise, analyse and synthesise historical evidence from both primary and secondary sources; v. the ability to develop and communicate cogent historical argument and knowledge in written and oral forms, employment the required referencing methods where necessary; vi. the ability to be self-directed and self-disciplined, and to show initiative.

Alignment of Assessment Tasks to Learning Outcomes

Assessment Tasks Learning Outcomes
1 2 3 4
1 - Written Assessment
2 - Practical and Written Assessment
3 - Online Quiz(zes)    

Alignment of Graduate Attributes to Learning Outcomes

  • Introductory Level
  • Intermediate Level
  • Graduate Level
Graduate Attributes Learning Outcomes
1 2 3 4
1. Communication
2. Problem Solving
3. Critical Thinking
4. Information Literacy
5. Team Work  
6. Information Technology Competence    
7. Cross Cultural Competence  
8. Ethical practice

Alignment of Assessment Tasks to Graduate Attributes

  • Introductory Level
  • Intermediate Level
  • Graduate Level
Assessment Tasks Graduate Attributes
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
1 - Written Assessment
2 - Practical and Written Assessment
3 - Online Quiz(zes)      

Prescribed Textbooks

The Essential World History, Volume I : to 1800
Author/s: Duiker, WJ, Spielvogel, JJ Year: 2015
Edition: 8th edn Publisher: Wadsworth Publishing Co.
City: Belmont State: CA
Country: USA
View textbooks at the CQUniversity Bookshop

IT Resources

You will need access to the following IT resources:
  • Word processing
  • CQUniversity Student Email
  • Internet
  • Unit Website (Moodle)
All submissions for this unit must use the Turabian referencing style (details can be obtained here). For further information, see the Assessment Tasks below.
Unit CoordinatorBarbara Webster (b.webster@cqu.edu.au)
Note: Check the Term-Specific section for any additional contact information provided by the teaching team
Week Begin Date Module/Topic Chapter Events and Submissions
Week 1 06-03-2017

Introduction; Studying History and Civilisation

Online Study Guide: Introduction and Topic 1

Week 2 13-03-2017

Ancient Near East

Topic 2

Online Weekly Quizzes (Topics 2-5) open Monday (13 Mar 17) 8:00 AM AEST

Week 3 20-03-2017

Ancient Greece and the Hellenistic Kingdoms

Topic 3

Week 4 27-03-2017

The Roman World

Topic 4

Week 5 03-04-2017

Medieval Europe

Topic 5

Vacation Week 10-04-2017

Online Weekly Quizzes (Topics 2-5) Due/close Friday (14 Apr 17) 11:00 PM AEST

Essay 1 Due Friday (14 Apr 17) 11:00 PM AEST
Week 6 17-04-2017

The Byzantine Empire and Islamic World

Topic 6

Online Weekly Quizzes (Topics 6-12) open Monday (17 Apr 17) 8:00 AM AEST.

Week 7 24-04-2017

Ancient India

Topic 7

Week 8 01-05-2017

Expansion of Civilisation in Southern and Southeast Asia

Topic 8

Week 9 08-05-2017

Ancient China

Topic 9

Week 10 15-05-2017

Traditional China

Topic 10

Week 11 22-05-2017

Early Japan, Korea and Vietnam

Topic 11

Week 12 29-05-2017

Early Civilisations in the Americas

Topic 12

Review/Exam Week 05-06-2017
Essay 2 Due Friday (09 Jun 17) 11:00 PM AEST
Online Weekly Quizzes Due Friday (09 Jun 17) 11:00 PM AEST
Exam Week 12-06-2017

1 Written Assessment

Assessment Title Essay 1
Task Description

Choose any ONE of a number of questions covering Topics 2-5 and answer in an essay of approximately 1,500 words (1,450-1,550 acceptable limits). Essay question choices are available on the HIST11037 Moodle course website, under Essay 1 in the Assessment Block.

Before commencing the essay, read the essay-writing guide, referencing guide and the sample essay provided in Moodle. Footnote references and a bibliography must be provided in the Turabian style. You are expected to include in the footnotes and bibliography a minimum of four tertiary-standard academic works of your own finding, in addition to the Duiker & Spielvogel textbook, the relevant study guide chapter and provided Course Resources Online (CRO) readings for that topic. The CQUni Library holds a wide range of authoritative works on each topic as well as many general histories and history journals, both in hardcopy and online.

Before submission, ensure your essay adequately meets the assessment criteria below.

Assessment Due Date Vacation Week Friday (14-Apr-2017) 11:00 PM AEST
Return Date to Students Essays will be marked and returned within two weeks of receipt by Course Coordinator.
Weighting 30%
Assessment Criteria

Assessment criteria [articulated with learning outcomes]

Historical content

  • presentation of accurate, relevant and unbiased historical evidence [LO 1, 2, 3, 4(i-vi)]

Research and referencing skills

  • evidence drawn from textbook, study guide and relevant CRO readings [LO 2, 4(i, ii, iii, iv, vi)]
  • evidence drawn from own research using a minimum of four tertiary-standard academic sources [LO 2, 4(i, ii, iii, iv, vi)]
  • appropriate and adequate acknowledgement of sources of ideas/evidence (footnotes) and any quotations (footnote and quote marks) [LO 3, 4(iii, vi)]
  • correct use of the Turabian referencing style [LO 3, 4(iii, iv)]

Communication skills

  • meeting the required number of words, the bulk of which should be own wording [LO 4 (iv, v, vi)]
  • logical structure/organisation of ideas [LO 4(i, iv, v, vi)]
  • clear, concise and correct written English [LO 4(i, iv, v, vi)]
  • presentation in formal essay style and layout [LO 4(v, iv)]
Referencing Style Turabian
Submission Online

Upload into Moodle as .doc or .docx. Ensure you run a Turnitin plagiarism check.

Learning Outcomes Assessed
This section can be expanded to view the assessed learning outcomes

1. demonstrate a broad knowledge of the political, economic, social and cultural history of major world civilisations and their interactions from pre-history to 1400CE (AD1400).

2. demonstrate an unprejudiced understanding of the differing worldviews of these civilisations and an acceptance of others' informed opinions.

3. demonstrate an understanding of the key historical problems of the period and be able to present evidence-backed solutions to these problems.

4. demonstrate the following skills: i. the ability to explain the significance of historical events and processes relevant to the period; ii. the ability to critique historical interpretations and their applications to contemporary global issues; iii. the ability to understand and use the principle that ethical action and social responsibility are inherent in the study of history and its interpretations; iv. the ability to locate, retrieve, organise, analyse and synthesise historical evidence from both primary and secondary sources; v. the ability to develop and communicate cogent historical argument and knowledge in written and oral forms, employment the required referencing methods where necessary; vi. the ability to be self-directed and self-disciplined, and to show initiative.

Graduate Attributes
This section can be expanded to view the assessed graduate attributes

1. Communication

2. Problem Solving

3. Critical Thinking

4. Information Literacy

5. Team Work

6. Information Technology Competence

7. Cross Cultural Competence

8. Ethical practice



2 Practical and Written Assessment

Assessment Title Essay 2
Task Description

Choose any ONE of a number of questions covering Topics 6-12 and answer in an essay of approximately 1,500 words (1,450-1,550 acceptable limits). Essay question choices are available on the HIST11037 Moodle course website, under Essay 2 in the Assessment Block.

Essay 2 should demonstrate a serious effort to rectify any problems identified in the marking feedback for Essay 1. As with Essay 1, follow the essay-writing and Turabian referencing guides provided in Moodle, in addition to the format and style of the sample essay.

Before submission, ensure your essay adequately meets the assessment criteria below.

NOTE: There is no longer any 'practical' component with this essay.

Assessment Due Date Review/Exam Week Friday (09-Jun-2017) 11:00 PM AEST
Return Date to Students Essays will be marked and returned within two weeks of receipt by Course Coordinator.
Weighting 40%
Assessment Criteria

Assessment criteria [articulated with learning outcomes]

Historical content

  • presentation of accurate, relevant and unbiased historical evidence [LO 1, 2, 3, 4(i-vi)]

Research and referencing skills

  • evidence drawn from textbook, study guide and relevant CRO readings [LO 2, 4(i, ii, iii, iv, vi)]
  • evidence drawn from own research using a minimum of four tertiary-standard academic sources [LO 2, 4(i, ii, iii, iv, vi)]
  • acknowledgement of all sources of ideas/evidence (footnote) and any quotations (footnote and quote marks) [LO 3, 4(iii, vi)]
  • correct use of the Turabian referencing style [LO 3, 4(iii, iv)]

Communication skills

  • meeting the required number of words, the bulk of which should be own wording ([LO 4 (iv, v, vi)]
  • logical structure/organisation of ideas [LO 4(i, iv, v, vi)]
  • clear, concise and correct written English [LO 4(i, iv, v, vi)]
  • presentation in formal essay style and layout [LO 4(v, iv)]
Referencing Style Turabian
Submission Online

Upload into Moodle as .doc or .docx. Ensure you run a Turnitin plagiarism check.

Learning Outcomes Assessed
This section can be expanded to view the assessed learning outcomes

1. demonstrate a broad knowledge of the political, economic, social and cultural history of major world civilisations and their interactions from pre-history to 1400CE (AD1400).

2. demonstrate an unprejudiced understanding of the differing worldviews of these civilisations and an acceptance of others' informed opinions.

3. demonstrate an understanding of the key historical problems of the period and be able to present evidence-backed solutions to these problems.

4. demonstrate the following skills: i. the ability to explain the significance of historical events and processes relevant to the period; ii. the ability to critique historical interpretations and their applications to contemporary global issues; iii. the ability to understand and use the principle that ethical action and social responsibility are inherent in the study of history and its interpretations; iv. the ability to locate, retrieve, organise, analyse and synthesise historical evidence from both primary and secondary sources; v. the ability to develop and communicate cogent historical argument and knowledge in written and oral forms, employment the required referencing methods where necessary; vi. the ability to be self-directed and self-disciplined, and to show initiative.

Graduate Attributes
This section can be expanded to view the assessed graduate attributes

1. Communication

2. Problem Solving

3. Critical Thinking

4. Information Literacy

5. Team Work

6. Information Technology Competence

7. Cross Cultural Competence

8. Ethical practice



3 Online Quiz(zes)

Assessment Title Online Weekly Quizzes
Task Description

To assess your factual knowledge of each weekly topic, there is a series of open-book, multi-choice quizzes to be taken in Moodle. Questions in each quiz are based on the relevant study guide topic/chapter and the corresponding Duiker & Spielvogel chapter. Each quiz contains 10 randomly selected questions which must be completed within 40 minutes and on the first attempt.

The assessed quizzes will open and close in two batches and can be taken at any time during the weeks they are available. Ideally, they should be done weekly after completion of each topic's study.

  • Quizzes for Topics 2–5 open 8am Monday of Week 2 (13 March) and close 11pm Friday of Midterm Vacation (14 April).
  • Quizzes for Topics 6–12 open 8am Monday of Week 6 (17 April) and close 11pm Friday of Course Review/Exam Week (9 June).

Over the term, you must complete a minimum of NINE assessed quizzes. If more quizzes are completed, the best nine results will be tallied.

There is a non-assessed practice quiz covering Topic 1 which can be taken as many times as required to familiarise yourself with the testing system. See Assessment Block in Moodle for more details.


Number of Quizzes 9
Frequency of Quizzes Weekly
Assessment Due Date Review/Exam Week Friday (09-Jun-2017) 11:00 PM AEST
Return Date to Students Students will receive their scores on submission of each quiz.
Weighting 30%
Assessment Criteria

Assessment criterion [articulated with learning outcomes]

Historical content

  • selection of the correct response [LO 1, 4(i, iv, vi)]
Submission Online

Take the weekly quiz by clicking on the Quiz icon in each week of the Moodle schedule.

Learning Outcomes Assessed
This section can be expanded to view the assessed learning outcomes

1. demonstrate a broad knowledge of the political, economic, social and cultural history of major world civilisations and their interactions from pre-history to 1400CE (AD1400).

4. demonstrate the following skills: i. the ability to explain the significance of historical events and processes relevant to the period; ii. the ability to critique historical interpretations and their applications to contemporary global issues; iii. the ability to understand and use the principle that ethical action and social responsibility are inherent in the study of history and its interpretations; iv. the ability to locate, retrieve, organise, analyse and synthesise historical evidence from both primary and secondary sources; v. the ability to develop and communicate cogent historical argument and knowledge in written and oral forms, employment the required referencing methods where necessary; vi. the ability to be self-directed and self-disciplined, and to show initiative.

Graduate Attributes
This section can be expanded to view the assessed graduate attributes

1. Communication

2. Problem Solving

4. Information Literacy

6. Information Technology Competence

8. Ethical practice




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