BIOL13031 - Ecology: Theory and Application
Term 2 - 2017


All details in this unit profile for BIOL13031 have been officially approved by CQUniversity and represent a learning partnership between the University and you (our student). The information will not be changed unless absolutely necessary and any change will be clearly indicated by an approved correction included in the profile.

Overview

Ecology is the study of the natural world: how organisms interact with one another and with their physical environment, and such knowledge is essential for any study in biology. In this unit, students will study ecology at different levels: the population, community, and evolutionary levels. Practical application of ecology will be emphasised in the study of principles of experimental design, and in the conduct of group research projects.

Details

Career Level Undergraduate
Unit Level Level 3
Credit Points 6
Student Contribution Band 7A
Fraction of Full-Time Student Load 0.125

Pre-requisites or Co-requisites

(ZOOL11005 Foundation Animal Biology and BOTN11004 Foundation Plant Biology) or (BIOL11099 Living Systems and BIOL11100 Functional Biology)

Residential Schools

This unit has a Compulsory Residential School for distance mode students and the details are:
Click here to see your Residential School Timetable.

Attendance Requirements

All on-campus students are expected to attend scheduled classes – in some units, these classes are identified as a mandatory (pass/fail) component and attendance is compulsory. International students, on a student visa, must maintain a full time study load and meet both attendance and academic progress requirements in each study period (satisfactory attendance for International students is defined as maintaining at least an 80% attendance record).

Offerings

Term 2 - 2017
  • Mixed Mode
  • Rockhampton

Website

This unit has a website, within the Moodle system, which is available two weeks before the start of term. It is important that you visit your Moodle site throughout the term. Go to Moodle

Recommended Student Time Commitment

Each 6-credit Undergraduate unit at CQUniversity requires an overall time commitment of an average of 12.5 hours of study per week, making a total of 150 hours for the unit.

Class Timetable

Assessment Overview

Assessment Task Weighting
1. Written Assessment 15%
2. Practical and Written Assessment 25%
3. Presentation 10%
4. Examination 50%

This is a graded unit: your overall grade will be calculated from the marks or grades for each assessment task, based on the relative weightings shown in the table above. You must obtain an overall mark for the unit of at least 50%, or an overall grade of ‘pass’ in order to pass the unit. If any ‘pass/fail’ tasks are shown in the table above they must also be completed successfully (‘pass’ grade). You must also meet any minimum mark requirements specified for a particular assessment task, as detailed in the ‘assessment task’ section (note that in some instances, the minimum mark for a task may be greater than 50%). Consult the University’s Grades and Results Procedures for more details of interim results and final grades.

All University policies are available on the IMPortal.

You may wish to view these policies:

  • Grades and Results Procedure
  • Assessment Policy and Procedure (Higher Education Coursework)
  • Review of Grade Procedure
  • Academic Misconduct Procedure
  • Monitoring Academic Progress (MAP) Policy and Procedure – Domestic Students
  • Monitoring Academic Progress (MAP) Policy and Procedure – International Students
  • Refund and Excess Payments (Credit Balances) Policy and Procedure
  • Student Feedback – Compliments and Complaints Policy and Procedure
  • Acceptable Use of Information and Communications Technology Facilities and Devices Policy and Procedure

This list is not an exhaustive list of all University policies. The full list of University policies are available on the IMPortal.

Feedback, Recommendations and Responses

Every unit is reviewed for enhancement each year. At the most recent review, the following staff and student feedback items were identified and recommendations were made.

Feedback Source Recommendation
Numerous positive comments regarding course content, structure, and assessment authenticity and student centredness were received. Personal comments, Moodle evaluation These aspects will be maintained, and strengthened where possible.
Some uncertainty continued to present in students unsure of their skills in Excel. Personal comments, email, Moodle evaluation A formal ALC tutorial will be arranged and trialed for next offering, and a more proactive role in linking students to the ALC will be pursued. Other sources of online help etc. will continue to be highlighted and made available.
Assignment return was considered too tardy. Moodle evaluation I will improve this and other related course component aspects (e.g., task feedback) for next offering by better planning of submission dates and marking around residential schools and other commitments.
Some students considered the unit Moodle site difficult to navigate at times. Moodle evaluation I will review site layout and improve organisation of resources appropriately.
On successful completion of this unit, you will be able to:
  1. Comprehend and analyse the elements, concepts, and theories of population and community structure and dynamics.
  2. Comprehend and evaluate the selected elements, concepts, and theories of evolutionary ecology.
  3. Integrate and apply your knowledge of population, evolutionary, and community ecology to real world situations.
  4. Develop further and utilise the skills necessary to undertake ecological fieldwork successfully and to analyse ecological data.
  5. Comprehend and apply the concept, and its elements, of good experimental design.
  6. Evaluate critically the scientific work of others in ecology.
  7. Integrate your comprehension of ecological theory with your comprehension and application of good experimental design to allow you to draw sound conclusions from ecological study.
  8. Communicate your knowledge and findings clearly both orally and in writing.

Alignment of Assessment Tasks to Learning Outcomes

Assessment Tasks Learning Outcomes
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
1 - Written Assessment        
2 - Practical and Written Assessment  
3 - Presentation  
4 - Examination  

Alignment of Graduate Attributes to Learning Outcomes

  • Introductory Level
  • Intermediate Level
  • Graduate Level
Graduate Attributes Learning Outcomes
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
1. Communication
2. Problem Solving
3. Critical Thinking
4. Information Literacy
5. Team Work          
6. Information Technology Competence
7. Cross Cultural Competence
8. Ethical practice

Alignment of Assessment Tasks to Graduate Attributes

  • Introductory Level
  • Intermediate Level
  • Graduate Level
Assessment Tasks Graduate Attributes
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
1 - Written Assessment  
2 - Practical and Written Assessment
3 - Presentation    
4 - Examination    

Prescribed Textbooks

Ecology The Economy of Nature
Author/s: Ricklefs, R & Relyea, R Year: 2014
Edition: 7th Publisher: WH Freeman & Co.
City: New York State: New York
Country: USA
View textbooks at the CQUniversity Bookshop
Note:

Latest edition, or recent edition is adequate.

IT Resources

You will need access to the following IT resources:
  • Internet
  • CQUniversity Student Email
  • Unit Website (Moodle)
  • A computer of adequate size and power, with sufficient hard drive and memory size and processing speed, large sound and video cards, plus adequate Internet access and connection reliability to facilitate significant uploads/downloads/video streaming and sustained lengthy connections (e.g., lecture video downloads, real time online tutorials) with microphone and speakers (built-in or external) OR microphone+speaker headset (cheap '$20' set is adequate).
  • Recent (not necessarily latest) computer software including Microsoft Word, Excel, Adobe Reader, Java or ability to download same and other required software to enable Blackboard Collaborate sessions (available free via unit Moodle site).
  • A lovely big brain keen to wonder at the natural world!
All submissions for this unit must use the Harvard (author-date) referencing style (details can be obtained here). For further information, see the Assessment Tasks below.
Unit CoordinatorBret Heath (b.heath@cqu.edu.au)
Note: Check the Term-Specific section for any additional contact information provided by the teaching team
Week Begin Date Module/Topic Chapter Events and Submissions
Week 1 10-07-2017

Best practice in ecology to get valid answers

(The design of ecological experiments)

(Relevant parts of textbook (across chapters) for each module are published on our unit Moodle site.)

Week 2 17-07-2017

What is a 'population' and what do they do?

(Concepts of population growth and regulation)

Week 3 24-07-2017

What determines what a population looks like, and how do we measure them?

(Concepts of population regulation (con't.) and sampling populations)

Week 4 31-07-2017

Organisms are patchy in patchy environments, really!

(Metapopulation ecology)

Week 5 07-08-2017

No population occurs or is shaped in isolation.

(How interaction factors affect distribution and abundance)

Journal article critique Due Friday (11 Aug 17) 11:45 PM AEST
Vacation Week 14-08-2017
Week 6 21-08-2017

Members shape a population, or species, in patches over time.

(Evolution, adaptation, and population ecology)

Residential school (combined block practicum) (Thurs 24 - Sat 26 Aug 2017 inclusive), compulsory for ALL students, and including student field work (towards Assessment item 2) & associated seminars (see Assessment item 3). Negotiation of submission date for Assessment item 2 will occur.

Week 7 28-08-2017

Life in a mosaic.

(Adaptations to heterogenous environments)

Week 8 04-09-2017

Developing the days of our lives.

(Evolutionary ecology of the life histories, sex and mating systems)

Week 9 11-09-2017

What is a 'community' and what do they do?

(The 'community concept', generalised community structure, and sampling communities)

Week 10 18-09-2017

How do communities recover from disturbance?

(Succession and the function of communities)

Week 11 25-09-2017

What determines the diversity of communities?

(Biodiversity (theories about diversity))

Week 12 02-10-2017

How do communities operate?

(Manipulative experiments at the community level)

Review/Exam Week 09-10-2017
Exam Week 16-10-2017

1 Written Assessment

Assessment Title Journal article critique
Task Description

Assessment details for ALL students

Assessment item 1 — Journal article critique

Due date: Friday of Week 5 (11 Aug 2017) ASSESSMENT
Weighting: 15% 1
Length: 1 500 - 2 000 words

You will need to access the specific requirements, advice, and resources published on our unit Moodle site (click on the appropriate link in the 'Assessment' box), however a general description is published here.

This assignment is a critique of a published scientific paper, nominated by the lecturer, from a reputable journal that publishes papers on ecological topics. Your access to the journal article will be via a link published on our unit Moodle site.

There is no set word limit, however you are encouraged to be as concise as possible (as is good scientific practice). A suggested maximum word limit is 2 000 words, but write as much as it takes to be comprehensive.

Despite the peer review or refereeing process, plenty of papers containing major flaws (in the experimental design and/or analysis and/or interpretation of the results) appear in reputable journals.

You are asked to referee the nominated paper critically (be very picky) with particular respect to the following features: (a) experimental design, (b) analyses of data (basic level), (c) interpretation of the data, i.e., conclusions drawn, and (d) your added constructive suggestions, with a brief rationale for each, for improvement of these aspects of the paper to support your criticisms.

In brief, you will critique the article for good experimental design and practice.

Writing and presentation styles, and spelling/grammatical or similar errors, found in the journal article will not be critiqued.

Assessment Due Date Week 5 Friday (11-Aug-2017) 11:45 PM AEST
Return Date to Students Week 8 Friday (08-Sep-2017)
Weighting 15%
Assessment Criteria

To pass this unit, a student must aggregate at least 50% of the total marks available in the unit, and score at least the minimum achievement levels set for each of the assessment item. The following criteria will be assessed equally.

Assessment evaluation criteria

Grade Standard
High Distinction (HD) (1) Responds fully to assignment. (2) Presents own synthesis of ideas involving rigorous critique and analysis. (3) Comprehension of good ecological experimental design as presented in the BIOL13031 unit materials is clearly evident. (4) Expresses viewpoint clearly and persuasively. (5) Begins and ends effectively. (6) Provides adequate supporting arguments, evidence, examples, and details. (7) Is well organised, sequenced, integrated, and unified. (8) Adequately and correctly acknowledges and documents sources. (9) Original text with no instances of plagiarism or weak paraphrasing. (10) Is free of errors in spelling, word choice, punctuation, grammar, and format. (11) Maintains a level of excellence throughout, and shows originality and creativity in realising (1) through (11).
Distinction (D) Realises (1) through (11) fully and completely, and demonstrates overall excellence, but shows little or no independent thought, critical analysis, originality, or creativity.
Credit (C) Realises (1) through (11) adequately, and demonstrates overall competence but contains a few, relatively minor errors or flaws. A Credit essay might show great independent thought, critical analysis, originality, and creativity, but these qualities do not make up for poor or careless writing, or lack of adequate attention to detail. A Credit essay typically looks and reads like a next-to-final draft.
Pass (P) Fails to realise some elements of (1) through (11) adequately, and contains several, relatively serious, errors or flaws, or many minor ones. A Pass essay typically looks and reads like an early draft.
Fail (F) Fails to realise several elements of (1) through (11) adequately, and contains many serious errors or flaws, and usually many minor ones too. A Fail essay typically looks and reads like a very rough first draft or even a zero draft.
(Adapted from Angelo, 1998)

A minimum achievement level is set for this assessment activity (i.e., you must equal or exceed this set minimum achievement level for you to be considered for a passing grade for this unit overall, irrespective of your achievement in other assessment components in this unit).

Conditions Minimum mark or grade - 45% of total marks available for this activity.
Referencing Style Harvard (author-date)
Submission Online

This journal article critique should be submitted on-line electronically only as a Microsoft Word (doc, docx) file, by the due date (unless approval for later submission is received via the onlline 'Assignment extension' system).

Learning Outcomes Assessed
This section can be expanded to view the assessed learning outcomes

4. Develop further and utilise the skills necessary to undertake ecological fieldwork successfully and to analyse ecological data.

5. Comprehend and apply the concept, and its elements, of good experimental design.

6. Evaluate critically the scientific work of others in ecology.

8. Communicate your knowledge and findings clearly both orally and in writing.

Graduate Attributes
This section can be expanded to view the assessed graduate attributes

1. Communication

2. Problem Solving

3. Critical Thinking

4. Information Literacy

6. Information Technology Competence

7. Cross Cultural Competence

8. Ethical practice



2 Practical and Written Assessment

Assessment Title Field project reports
Task Description

Note attendance of all students is required for our residential school/combined block practicum during which planning and data collection for this ‘Assessment item 2 – Field project reports’ will be undertaken, and ‘Assessment item 3 – Project seminar’ will be undertaken and completed.

Assessment details for ALL students

Assessment item 2 - Field project reports

Due date: To be negotiated at residential school (combined block practicum) but typically within three (3) weeks of end of combined block practicum ASSESSMENT
Weighting: 25% 2
Length: No more than 4 000 words
You will need to access the specific requirements, advice, and resources published on our unit Moodle site (click on the appropriate link in the 'Assessment' box), however a general description is published here.

During our compulsory residential school (combined block practicum), students will undertake field and laboratory-based data collection that (a) will be required to be reported on in written form for assignment submission (as Assessment item 2), and (b) will provide the project findings to be presented orally to the class (Assessment item 3).

The field projects, based on relevant trips to field sites, will be undertaken during residential school (CBP):

  • a fire ecology (population ecology) project (15%) researching the impacts of fire management in conjunction with Queensland Parks & Wildlife Service (QPWS) in nearby Mount Archer National Park, and
  • a community ecology project (10%) researching and describing the rocky intertidal community on the nearby Capricorn Coast.

The 'fire ecology' report will take the format of a scientific paper (but not including an Abstract).

The 'rocky intertidal community' report will simply be a series of analyses and graphing treatments, each with a brief sentence or two interpreting the analytical results.

Please note successful completion of both reports will require basic to intermediate skills in the use of Microsoft Word (for tabulating data, inserting photographs/maps etc., constructing and formatting your reports) and Microsoft Excel (for spreadsheeting and charting/graphing data). If your skills are not strong in these areas, you are advised to undertake practice, or utilise in-built help sources, and/or Internet videos and other instructions to improve your skills sooner rather than later.

Importantly, while data collection is conducted in teams, each report is to be an individual's written report of the ecological field project work. That is, whatever your role in the team or the comparative degree of your contribution to the team (design, data gathering, analysis) the writing up and presentation of data is to be your own original work culminating in your report. (The exception, of course, are the data used as these should be shared within your team, and any common references cited.) Plagiarism and weakly paraphrasing the work of another, even that of a team member, will not be acceptable, tolerated, or treated lightly.

Students will be expected to source learning materials/research and read around topics in the unit, as need and interest dictate, using resources such as science journal and magazine publications, other texts, reputable web sites and so on, as part of CQUniversity’s focus on lifelong learning and self-directed independent learning.

Assessment Due Date To be negotiated at residential school/combined block practicum (but typically within three (3) weeks of the end of the BIOL13031 combined block practicum).
Return Date to Students Review/Exam Week Friday (13-Oct-2017)
Weighting 25%
Assessment Criteria

To pass this unit, a student must aggregate at least 50% of the total marks available in the unit, and score at least the minimum achievement levels set for each assessment item.

Students are expected to source learning materials, research and read around topics in the unit, as personal need and interest dictates, using resources such as science journal and magazine publications, other texts, reputable web sites and so on, as part of CQUniversity's focus on lifelong learning and self-directed independent learning.

The evaluation of this assessment will be as follows: evaluation of your 'fire ecology' project report will be according to the assignment evaluation criteria published for here below, while evaluation of your rocky intertidal community' project component will be criterion-referenced according to the number and accuracy of prescribed (at residential school) treatments applied to your data.


Please note a minimum achievement level is set for this assessment item (i.e., you must equal or exceed this set minimum achievement level for you to be considered for a passing grade for this unit overall, irrespective of your achievement in other assessment components in this unit).

(Adapted from Angelo, 1998)

Grade Standard
High Distinction (HD) (1) Responds fully to assignment. (2) Presents own synthesis of ideas involving rigorous critique and analysis. (3) Comprehension of good ecological experimental design as presented in the BIOL13031 unit materials is clearly evident. (4) Expresses viewpoint clearly and persuasively. (5) Begins and ends effectively. (6) Provides adequate supporting arguments, evidence, examples, and details. (7) Is well organised, sequenced, integrated, and unified. (8) Adequately and correctly acknowledges and documents sources. (9) Original text with no instances of plagiarism or weak paraphrasing. (10) Is free of errors in spelling, word choice, punctuation, grammar, and format. (11) Maintains a level of excellence throughout, and shows originality and creativity in realising (1) through (11).
Distinction (D) Realises (1) through (11) fully and completely, and demonstrates overall excellence, but shows little or no independent thought, critical analysis, originality, or creativity.
Credit (C) Realises (1) through (11) adequately, and demonstrates overall competence but contains a few, relatively minor errors or flaws. A Credit submission might show great independent thought, critical analysis, originality, and creativity, but these qualities do not make up for poor or careless writing, or lack of adequate attention to detail. A Credit work typically looks and reads like a next-to-final draft.
Pass (P) Fails to realise some elements of (1) through (11) adequately, and contains several, relatively serious, errors or flaws, or many minor ones. A Pass submission typically looks and reads like an early draft.
Fail (F) Fails to realise several elements of (1) through (11) adequately, and contains many serious errors or flaws, and usually many minor ones too. A Fail submission typically looks and reads like a very rough first draft or even a zero draft.

Conditions Minimum mark or grade - 45% of total marks available for this activity.
Referencing Style Harvard (author-date)
Submission Online

These field project reports should be submitted on-line electronically as a single Word document (only doc or docx file), by the due date (unless approval for later submission is received via the onlline 'Assignment extension' system).

Learning Outcomes Assessed
This section can be expanded to view the assessed learning outcomes

1. Comprehend and analyse the elements, concepts, and theories of population and community structure and dynamics.

2. Comprehend and evaluate the selected elements, concepts, and theories of evolutionary ecology.

3. Integrate and apply your knowledge of population, evolutionary, and community ecology to real world situations.

4. Develop further and utilise the skills necessary to undertake ecological fieldwork successfully and to analyse ecological data.

5. Comprehend and apply the concept, and its elements, of good experimental design.

7. Integrate your comprehension of ecological theory with your comprehension and application of good experimental design to allow you to draw sound conclusions from ecological study.

8. Communicate your knowledge and findings clearly both orally and in writing.

Graduate Attributes
This section can be expanded to view the assessed graduate attributes

1. Communication

2. Problem Solving

3. Critical Thinking

4. Information Literacy

5. Team Work

6. Information Technology Competence

7. Cross Cultural Competence

8. Ethical practice



3 Presentation

Assessment Title 'Fire ecology' project seminar
Task Description

Note attendance of all students is required for our residential school/combined block practicum during which planning and data collection for ‘Assessment item 2 – Field project reports’ will be undertaken, and this ‘Assessment item 3 – Project seminar’ will be undertaken and completed.

Assessment details for ALL students

Assessment item 3 - 'fire ecology' project seminar

Due date: Final stages of residential school (combined block practicum) ASSESSMENT
Weighting: 10% 3
Length: 15 minutes plus 5 minutes question time

You will need to access the specific requirements, advice, and resources published on our unit Moodle site (click on the appropriate link in the 'Assessment' box), however a general description is published here.

In the closing stages of our residential school/combined block practicum, students in their teams will present their findings from their 'fire ecology' fieldwork projects. Students will present as a team, sharing the presentation duties equally among team members, in the form of a relaxed research seminar, to the class in a lecture theatre. Seminar format should approximate the primary sections of a scientific paper (i.e., Materials & Methods, Results, Discussion (including deficiencies, sources of error, improvements, further research), and Conclusion), and include suitable acknowledgement of sources and team members. In any case, this assessment is meant to occur in as relaxed, informal, and stress-free an environment as possible, and still be professional and informative.

Time is built in to our residential school/combined block practicum for preparation for this activity, and bringing your own laptop is helpful in this (rather than needing to access university computer labs).

Success in this activity is not based on the elaborateness or 'prettiness' of presentations but rather their content, and effectiveness in communication.

Students will be expected to source learning materials/research and read around topics in the unit, as need and interest dictate, using resources such as science journal and magazine publications, other texts, reputable web sites and so on, as part of CQUniversity’s focus on lifelong learning and self-directed independent learning.

Assessment Due Date During final stages of our residential school/combined block practicum (on 27 Aug 2016).
Return Date to Students Near the close of our residential school/combined block practicum (on 26 Aug 2017).
Weighting 10%
Assessment Criteria

To pass this unit, a student must aggregate at least 50% of the total marks available in the unit, and score at least the minimum achievement levels set for each assessment item.

Students will be expected to source learning materials/research and read around topics in the unit, as need and interest dictate, using resources such as science journal and magazine publications, other texts, reputable web sites and so on, as part of CQUniversity’s focus on lifelong learning and self-directed independent learning.

Each team member will be evaluated out of a total 30 marks. While students in a team are expected to present as a team (dividing up the presentation among team members), individual performances will be evaluated according to the following criteria: presentation quality (mark out of 10), and handling of questions (mark out of 10). The team as a whole will be judged for overall seminar content (mark out of 10), and this mark will be applied to all team members. Thus each team member will initially receive a mark out of 30 which will be divided by 3 to produce a mark out of 10 (to scale achievement to the 10% weighting for this activity).

A minimum achievement level is set for this assessment activity (i.e., you must equal or exceed this set minimum achievement level for you to be considered for a passing grade for this unit overall, irrespective of your achievement in other assessment components in this unit).

The mark sheet used to evaluate the presentations is summarised below, and published on the unit Moodle site.

Seminar assessment form

Group members’ names Presentation* ( /10) Overall seminar content ( /10) Handling of questions** /10) TOTAL ( /30) MARK ( /10)

Project title:

Marker’s comments:

Note

*‘Presentation’ to include consideration of conciseness, clarity, delivery, effectiveness of use of any aids (e.g. PowerPoint, OHPs, drawings on board, etc.), and completion in the time allotted.

**’Handling of questions’ to include consideration of confidence shown, good recall of work done, not unsettled by unexpected questions, not defensive but a respectful and scientific approach, not being afraid to say ‘I don’t know’, appropriate reference to reported ‘areas for further work’ and/or ‘areas for improvement’/’sources of possible error’, and general participation/enthusiasm/ teamwork in answering questions.

Conditions Minimum mark or grade - 45% of total marks available for this activity.
Referencing Style Harvard (author-date)
Submission Hard copy

Presentation is delivered during residential school/combined block practicum.

Learning Outcomes Assessed
This section can be expanded to view the assessed learning outcomes

1. Comprehend and analyse the elements, concepts, and theories of population and community structure and dynamics.

2. Comprehend and evaluate the selected elements, concepts, and theories of evolutionary ecology.

3. Integrate and apply your knowledge of population, evolutionary, and community ecology to real world situations.

4. Develop further and utilise the skills necessary to undertake ecological fieldwork successfully and to analyse ecological data.

5. Comprehend and apply the concept, and its elements, of good experimental design.

7. Integrate your comprehension of ecological theory with your comprehension and application of good experimental design to allow you to draw sound conclusions from ecological study.

8. Communicate your knowledge and findings clearly both orally and in writing.

Graduate Attributes
This section can be expanded to view the assessed graduate attributes

1. Communication

4. Information Literacy

5. Team Work

6. Information Technology Competence

7. Cross Cultural Competence

8. Ethical practice



Examination

Outline Complete an examination
Date During the University examination period
Weighting 50%
Condition Minimum percentage of examination marks required to pass course - 45% of total marks available for this activity.
Length 120 minutes
Details Dictionary - non-electronic, concise, direct translation only (dictionary must not contain any notes or comments).
No Calculators Permitted
Closed Book
Learning Outcomes Assessed
This section can be expanded to view the assessed learning outcomes

1. Comprehend and analyse the elements, concepts, and theories of population and community structure and dynamics.

2. Comprehend and evaluate the selected elements, concepts, and theories of evolutionary ecology.

3. Integrate and apply your knowledge of population, evolutionary, and community ecology to real world situations.

5. Comprehend and apply the concept, and its elements, of good experimental design.

6. Evaluate critically the scientific work of others in ecology.

7. Integrate your comprehension of ecological theory with your comprehension and application of good experimental design to allow you to draw sound conclusions from ecological study.

8. Communicate your knowledge and findings clearly both orally and in writing.

Graduate Attributes
This section can be expanded to view the assessed graduate attributes

1. Communication

2. Problem Solving

3. Critical Thinking

4. Information Literacy

7. Cross Cultural Competence

8. Ethical practice


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