LITR11055 - Popular Genres
Term 1 - 2017


All details in this unit profile for LITR11055 have been officially approved by CQUniversity and represent a learning partnership between the University and you (our student). The information will not be changed unless absolutely necessary and any change will be clearly indicated by an approved correction included in the profile.

Overview

In this unit, you will be introduced to the study of film, TV and other media by examining the theories and practices associated with particular genres such as romance, fantasy and crime, and by learning to apply basic semiotic analysis to selected texts. You will examine the ways in which popular genres both reflect and contribute to the meaning of contemporary life, and you will explore how these genres both challenge and support normative ideologies as well as model everyday behaviour. This unit functions as an introduction to more advanced studies in literary and cultural studies.

Details

Career Level Undergraduate
Unit Level Level 1
Credit Points 6
Student Contribution Band 1
Fraction of Full-Time Student Load 0.125

Attendance Requirements

All on-campus students are expected to attend scheduled classes – in some units, these classes are identified as a mandatory (pass/fail) component and attendance is compulsory. International students, on a student visa, must maintain a full time study load and meet both attendance and academic progress requirements in each study period (satisfactory attendance for International students is defined as maintaining at least an 80% attendance record).

Offerings

Term 1 - 2017
  • Distance
  • Rockhampton

Website

This unit has a website, within the Moodle system, which is available two weeks before the start of term. It is important that you visit your Moodle site throughout the term. Go to Moodle

Recommended Student Time Commitment

Each 6-credit Undergraduate unit at CQUniversity requires an overall time commitment of an average of 12.5 hours of study per week, making a total of 150 hours for the unit.

Class Timetable

Assessment Overview

Assessment Task Weighting
1. Written Assessment 20%
2. Written Assessment 40%
3. Presentation 40%

This is a graded unit: your overall grade will be calculated from the marks or grades for each assessment task, based on the relative weightings shown in the table above. You must obtain an overall mark for the unit of at least 50%, or an overall grade of ‘pass’ in order to pass the unit. If any ‘pass/fail’ tasks are shown in the table above they must also be completed successfully (‘pass’ grade). You must also meet any minimum mark requirements specified for a particular assessment task, as detailed in the ‘assessment task’ section (note that in some instances, the minimum mark for a task may be greater than 50%). Consult the University’s Grades and Results Procedures for more details of interim results and final grades.

All University policies are available on the IMPortal.

You may wish to view these policies:

  • Grades and Results Procedure
  • Assessment Policy and Procedure (Higher Education Coursework)
  • Review of Grade Procedure
  • Academic Misconduct Procedure
  • Monitoring Academic Progress (MAP) Policy and Procedure – Domestic Students
  • Monitoring Academic Progress (MAP) Policy and Procedure – International Students
  • Refund and Excess Payments (Credit Balances) Policy and Procedure
  • Student Feedback – Compliments and Complaints Policy and Procedure
  • Acceptable Use of Information and Communications Technology Facilities and Devices Policy and Procedure

This list is not an exhaustive list of all University policies. The full list of University policies are available on the IMPortal.

Evaluation

Term 1 - 2015: The overall satisfaction for students in the last offering of this unit was 3.8 (on a 5 point Likert scale), based on a 59% response rate.

Feedback, Recommendations and Responses

Every unit is reviewed for enhancement each year. At the most recent review, the following staff and student feedback items were identified and recommendations were made.

Feedback Source Recommendation
Feedback for assessment was very helpful and returned very quickly! Cource Evaluation Instrument The course coordinator will continue to provide relevant and useful feedback was well as quick turnaround times for assessment items (14 days or better).
It would be really helpful to have face to face classes available in Mackay. Cource Evaluation Instrument Weekly BBC sessions will again be offered in 2016 and recorded.
Great course - fascinating content and generally enjoyable experience. The course and the lecturer were very interesting and engaging. Cource Evaluation Instrument The course coordinator will continue to implement progressive strategies to improve on the course positives.
The course was well structured and the resources we needed were relatively easy to find. Feedback on my first assessment piece was within the time frame that was given. My questions posted on the Q&A in moodle were answered within 24hrs or sooner. Cource Evaluation Instrument The course coordinator will continue to implement progressive strategies to improve on the course positives.
The biggest need of improvement was the online video lectures. Other than that everything with the course was fine. Cource Evaluation Instrument Progressive updating of course materials started in 2015 and will continue into 2016.
I think the weekly forum posts were a little too much. I realise how they extend our learning though I have a busy home life family and kids so it was extremely hard for me to get them done, hence why most of them weren't. The readings and other 3 writing assessment pieces were enough. Cource Evaluation Instrument This is a progressive assessment item requiring the submission of 10 forum posts each worrth 2%. Assessment pieces are formative and designed to get students thinking about the weekly topics. This was explained, but students do need to allow time to complete this task and submit their posts according to the timeframe.
The best aspect was the assignments and feedback. Good feedback on my assignments helped me to better my learning. Cource Evaluation Instrument In 2015, a feedback matrix was provided for all assessment tasks and made readily available to all students to clarify the assessment critera for each assessment item.
On successful completion of this unit, you will be able to:
  1. Recognise the defining elements of various popular genres and analyse the significance of these elements in particular texts.
  2. Articulate the ways in which popular genres both affirm and subvert the 'norms' of culture, and function as sites of contestation for the meanings, values and ideologies represented within them.
  3. Demonstrate advanced skills in reading, research and textual analysis.
  4. Show increased confidence and competence in written, oral, on-line and group communication skills using the vocabulary of concepts provided by the unit.

Alignment of Assessment Tasks to Learning Outcomes

Assessment Tasks Learning Outcomes
1 2 3 4
1 - Written Assessment
2 - Written Assessment
3 - Presentation

Alignment of Graduate Attributes to Learning Outcomes

  • Introductory Level
  • Intermediate Level
  • Graduate Level
Graduate Attributes Learning Outcomes
1 2 3 4
1. Communication  
2. Problem Solving
3. Critical Thinking
4. Information Literacy      
5. Team Work      
6. Information Technology Competence    
7. Cross Cultural Competence    
8. Ethical practice      

Alignment of Assessment Tasks to Graduate Attributes

  • Introductory Level
  • Intermediate Level
  • Graduate Level
Assessment Tasks Graduate Attributes
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
1 - Written Assessment          
2 - Written Assessment          
3 - Presentation      

Textbook Information

There are no required textbooks. Note:

Students will be required to watch a number of films and do assigned readings during the course.

IT Resources

You will need access to the following IT resources:
  • CQUniversity Student Email
  • Internet
  • Unit Website (Moodle)
All submissions for this unit must use the Harvard (author-date) referencing style (details can be obtained here). For further information, see the Assessment Tasks below.
Unit CoordinatorStephen Butler (s.butler@cqu.edu.au)
Note: Check the Term-Specific section for any additional contact information provided by the teaching team
Week Begin Date Module/Topic Chapter Events and Submissions
Week 1 06-03-2017

Introduction

Week 2 13-03-2017

Genre

Week 3 20-03-2017

Soap Opera

Short Paper Exercise Due Friday (24 Mar 17) 11:45 PM AEST
Week 4 27-03-2017

Situation Comedy

Week 5 03-04-2017

Romance

Vacation Week 10-04-2017
Week 6 17-04-2017

Adventure

Week 7 24-04-2017

Fantasy

Week 8 01-05-2017

Science Fiction

Online Discussion Forum Due Friday (05 May 17) 11:45 PM AEST
Week 9 08-05-2017

Horror

Week 10 15-05-2017

Crime & Detection

Week 11 22-05-2017

Rock

Week 12 29-05-2017

New Genres/ Reality TV

The Pitch Due Friday (02 Jun 17) 11:45 PM AEST
Review/Exam Week 05-06-2017
Exam Week 12-06-2017

1 Written Assessment

Assessment Title Short Paper Exercise
Task Description

Word limit: 750-1000 words

Choose a popular text and discuss its relation to genres. Describe it in terms of the repertoire of elements and develop an argument regarding its representation of social values (ideology) through analysis of connotations in critical scenes.

Students are required to present this paper using what is known as the five paragraph essay structure - an example can be found at the Purdue Online Writing Lab: https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/685/05/ ;

Word limit: 750-1000 words

Weighting: 20% of overall grade

Five Paragraph Essay: other examples:

http://grammar.ccc.commnet.edu/grammar/five_par.htm ;
http://www.studygs.net/fiveparag.htm ;
http://www.time4writing.com/writing-resources/writing-five-paragraph-essays-for-standardized-test/

Assessment Due Date Week 3 Friday (24-Mar-2017) 11:45 PM AEST
Return Date to Students Week 5 Friday (07-Apr-2017)
Weighting 20%
Assessment Criteria

This assignment will be evaluated on the extent to which it demonstrates:

  1. A clear recognition and understanding of the defining elements of relevant popular genres, and the ability analyze the significance of these using the repertoire of elements and semiotic concepts in particular texts;
  2. Effective use of the five paragraph essay structure; including the ability to identify and evaluate arguments, synthesize ideas, and develop coherent positions;
  3. The ability to demonstrate an understanding that popular texts both affirm and subvert ideological norms;
  4. Critical clarity of expression and presentation (including spelling and grammar); and, critical references to no less than 5 scholarly sources and has appropriately acknowledged all sources using the Harvard (author-date) referencing style.
Referencing Style Harvard (author-date)
Submission Online

Learning Outcomes Assessed
This section can be expanded to view the assessed learning outcomes

1. Recognise the defining elements of various popular genres and analyse the significance of these elements in particular texts.

2. Articulate the ways in which popular genres both affirm and subvert the 'norms' of culture, and function as sites of contestation for the meanings, values and ideologies represented within them.

3. Demonstrate advanced skills in reading, research and textual analysis.

4. Show increased confidence and competence in written, oral, on-line and group communication skills using the vocabulary of concepts provided by the unit.

Graduate Attributes
This section can be expanded to view the assessed graduate attributes

1. Communication

2. Problem Solving

3. Critical Thinking



2 Written Assessment

Assessment Title Online Discussion Forum
Task Description

Each week you will address the forum discussion question (see Moodle website) and post it to the relevant forum. Although the assignment is due in week 8 the genres and topic of weeks 9-12 can be included. On the due date, you gather your best 8 responses in a Word document and upload it to the assignment page. Although the journal is not an essay, you are expected to make a clear and brief thesis statement. The bulk of the discussion does not have to be written in essay form: notes, quotes, dot points, tables, diagrams, drawings, etc. are acceptable. However, this is not an excuse for sloppiness; neatness and coherence (readability) and punctuation will be taken into account. Referencing must be correct (i.e. Harvard (author-date) style)

Word limit: Each response should be no more than 200-250 in total.

Assessment Due Date Week 8 Friday (05-May-2017) 11:45 PM AEST
Students are strongly advised to complete these forum tasks early and regularly.
Return Date to Students Exam Week Friday (16-Jun-2017)
Weighting 40%
Assessment Criteria

This assignment will be evaluated on the extent to which it demonstrates:

1. A clear recognition and understanding of the defining elements of relevant popular genres, and the ability to analyse the significance of these using semiotic concepts in particular texts;

2. The ability to identify and evaluate arguments, synthesize ideas, and develop a coherent position;

3. The ability to demonstrate an understanding that popular texts both affirm and subvert ideological norms

4. Clarity of expression and presentation (including spelling and grammar); and,

5. Appropriate acknowledgement of all sources using the Harvard (author-date) referencing style.

Referencing Style Harvard (author-date)
Submission Online

See Moodle website.

Learning Outcomes Assessed
This section can be expanded to view the assessed learning outcomes

1. Recognise the defining elements of various popular genres and analyse the significance of these elements in particular texts.

2. Articulate the ways in which popular genres both affirm and subvert the 'norms' of culture, and function as sites of contestation for the meanings, values and ideologies represented within them.

3. Demonstrate advanced skills in reading, research and textual analysis.

4. Show increased confidence and competence in written, oral, on-line and group communication skills using the vocabulary of concepts provided by the unit.

Graduate Attributes
This section can be expanded to view the assessed graduate attributes

1. Communication

4. Information Literacy

6. Information Technology Competence



3 Presentation

Assessment Title The Pitch
Task Description

This "authentic learning” exercise involves creativity and role-play. You have an idea for a film or TV show that you want to make. Before you can go any further, you have to convince the studio executives to approve and fund the project. To do this, you need to create a 'pitch'.

Your pitch should include a title, tagline, plot synopsis (very brief), a description of the repertoire of elements, list of characters (and the actors who might play them), and a brief discussion of themes and issues (full details provided on the course website). You may wish to make a 'trailer/ preview', and/or include a sample of the screenplay/memorable quotes. You are invited to be as creative as you want with the 'pitch' (provided you include all the appropriate elements).

The is also a 500-word critical component, in which you account for the creative project using semiotic terms and concepts.

Possible Formats

Students might choose to submit their pitch using ONE of the following six formats:
1. A storyboard - @16 - 20 panels max - A sequence of drawings (like a comic), typically with some directions and dialogue, representing each shot.
2. A dramatic script - The written text of your idea for a film/TV show, including directions and dialogue.
3. A WORD document synopsis - A piece of prose, giving the main points of your idea for the film/TV show in a written narrative form.
4. A monologue/dialogue - a voice recording of your idea for a film/TV show as a vocal presentation.
5. A 'trailer' - a digital clip of your pitch including voice-over commentary.
6. A new style - This is a chance for students to break away from the traditional pre-production film/TV show pitch formats and present your idea in another way: using other visual or media arts forms, or alternative performing arts modes, for example.

The only proviso is that whatever format you choose must include all the requirements specified in the The Pitch - Explained and the Assignment Description: "Your pitch should include a title, tagline, plot synopsis (very brief), a description of the repertoire of elements, list of characters (and the actors who might play them), and a brief discussion of themes and issues. You may wish to make a 'trailer/ preview', and/or include a sample of the screenplay/memorable quotes."

Internal students will be expected to work in teams in class. They will present their pitches to the class in weeks 11 & 12.

Distance students will be expected to submit their 'pitch' by week 12, though they may submit earlier if they wish. Distance students may also work in teams if they wish, but they need to advise their course coordinator by email of the members of their group. Group assessment means that the assessment mark will be for the group (i.e. the group will be awarded one mark, and all students in the group will get the same mark as everyone else). If you choose this option, please make sure that your assignment clearly identifies itself as a joint assignment and includes the relevant student names. For distance students, the pitch should be submitted online through Moodle.

Note: Further details about this assessment piece including submission instructions are available on the course website.

Word limit: 2000-2500 words

Assessment Due Date Week 12 Friday (02-Jun-2017) 11:45 PM AEST
Return Date to Students Exam Week Friday (16-Jun-2017)
Weighting 40%
Assessment Criteria

This assignment will be evaluated on the extent to which it demonstrates:

  1. Potential for the pitch to be made into a film (e.g. its creativity, plausibility & credibility);
  2. Enthusiasm of the presenters for their project and their storytelling skills;
  3. The ability to demonstrate an understanding that popular texts both affirm and subvert ideological norms
  4. Clarity of expression and presentation (including spelling and grammar); and,
  5. Appropriate acknowledgement of all sources using the Harvard (author-date) referencing style.
Referencing Style Harvard (author-date)
Submission Online

Details provided on the Moodle course website.

Learning Outcomes Assessed
This section can be expanded to view the assessed learning outcomes

1. Recognise the defining elements of various popular genres and analyse the significance of these elements in particular texts.

2. Articulate the ways in which popular genres both affirm and subvert the 'norms' of culture, and function as sites of contestation for the meanings, values and ideologies represented within them.

3. Demonstrate advanced skills in reading, research and textual analysis.

4. Show increased confidence and competence in written, oral, on-line and group communication skills using the vocabulary of concepts provided by the unit.

Graduate Attributes
This section can be expanded to view the assessed graduate attributes

2. Problem Solving

3. Critical Thinking

5. Team Work

7. Cross Cultural Competence

8. Ethical practice




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