SOCL19065 - Rural Sociology for Health and Social Services
Term 1 - 2017


All details in this unit profile for SOCL19065 have been officially approved by CQUniversity and represent a learning partnership between the University and you (our student). The information will not be changed unless absolutely necessary and any change will be clearly indicated by an approved correction included in the profile.

Overview

This unit will prepare you for rural practice by providing an overview of rural Australia and its social, cultural, geographic, environmental and economic influences. Guided by a sociological perspective, you will gain an understanding of the historical transformation of rural Australia, and the social structures and cultural processes underpinning problems that characterise rural communities. The meaning of ‘rurality’ and the implications of ‘rurality’ for health and social service delivery and practice is covered from a range of viewpoints and experiences. You will develop an understanding of your role as professionals, and of rural health issues, including the health status of Indigenous Australians. You will gain an appreciation of the unique features of rural service delivery in relation to the use of communication technology, rural practice models, and responses to natural disasters. This unit would be of particular interest to those planning to live and work in rural and remote Australia; including allied health practitioners, community development officers, nurses, paramedics and teachers.

Details

Career Level Undergraduate
Unit Level Level 2
Credit Points 6
Student Contribution Band 1
Fraction of Full-Time Student Load 0.125

Pre-requisites or Co-requisites

Students are required to have completed 24 units of credit.

Attendance Requirements

All on-campus students are expected to attend scheduled classes – in some units, these classes are identified as a mandatory (pass/fail) component and attendance is compulsory. International students, on a student visa, must maintain a full time study load and meet both attendance and academic progress requirements in each study period (satisfactory attendance for International students is defined as maintaining at least an 80% attendance record).

Offerings

Term 1 - 2017
  • Distance

Website

This unit has a website, within the Moodle system, which is available two weeks before the start of term. It is important that you visit your Moodle site throughout the term. Go to Moodle

Recommended Student Time Commitment

Each 6-credit Undergraduate unit at CQUniversity requires an overall time commitment of an average of 12.5 hours of study per week, making a total of 150 hours for the unit.

Class Timetable

Assessment Overview

Assessment Task Weighting
1. Online Quiz(zes) 20%
2. Written Assessment 40%
3. Portfolio 40%

This is a graded unit: your overall grade will be calculated from the marks or grades for each assessment task, based on the relative weightings shown in the table above. You must obtain an overall mark for the unit of at least 50%, or an overall grade of ‘pass’ in order to pass the unit. If any ‘pass/fail’ tasks are shown in the table above they must also be completed successfully (‘pass’ grade). You must also meet any minimum mark requirements specified for a particular assessment task, as detailed in the ‘assessment task’ section (note that in some instances, the minimum mark for a task may be greater than 50%). Consult the University’s Grades and Results Procedures for more details of interim results and final grades.

All University policies are available on the IMPortal.

You may wish to view these policies:

  • Grades and Results Procedure
  • Assessment Policy and Procedure (Higher Education Coursework)
  • Review of Grade Procedure
  • Academic Misconduct Procedure
  • Monitoring Academic Progress (MAP) Policy and Procedure – Domestic Students
  • Monitoring Academic Progress (MAP) Policy and Procedure – International Students
  • Refund and Excess Payments (Credit Balances) Policy and Procedure
  • Student Feedback – Compliments and Complaints Policy and Procedure
  • Acceptable Use of Information and Communications Technology Facilities and Devices Policy and Procedure

This list is not an exhaustive list of all University policies. The full list of University policies are available on the IMPortal.

Feedback, Recommendations and Responses

Every unit is reviewed for enhancement each year. At the most recent review, the following staff and student feedback items were identified and recommendations were made.

Feedback Source Recommendation
Lack of understanding about the role and value of sociology for allied health students and knowing about rural communities and their associated social issues. Course Evaluation More extensive attention will be given to explaining sociology and the value of a sociological perspective early in the course and in the assessments. Students will be informed of the importance of a holistic approach to the management and treatment of patients and clients, In particular, students will need to understand how and why social problems, health issues and treatment uptake are influenced by social phenomena such as social class, ethnicity, sexuality, gender and geographical location.
The eFIL (electronic facilitated online learning) exercises are educational and kept students connected to the weekly topics. Course Evaluation Continue to use this type of assessment and encourage students to engage in group discussions to facilitate peer learning.
More time for the online quiz - 30 questions in 30 minutes did not allow time to check answers. Course Evaluation It is standard across other courses for the an online quiz assessment to have one minute per question. The assessment requires students to demonstrate their understanding and knowledge of key concepts and issues. The time is set to avoid collusion and looking up of every answer.
Shorter lectures, more diverse delivery and faster presentation. Course Evaluation The lectures and lecture notes will be reviewed and other supporting resources provided.
On successful completion of this unit, you will be able to:
  1. Use sociological theories and perspectives to discuss the impacts of global forces and historical changes on the social organisation of Australian rural society.
  2. Identify the social-structural characteristics of rural areas and the factors (social, economic, cultural) that influence the health of rural Australians, and delivery of health care to rural and remote areas.
  3. Describe the health issues experienced by Indigenous Australians and other social groups (e.g., new migrants, people living with disability) living in rural and remote communities.
  4. Explain the role of the health professional working and living in rural and remote Australia, and the rewards and challenges this provides.
  5. Compare and contrast the various health service delivery models used in rural and remote communities.

Alignment of Assessment Tasks to Learning Outcomes

Assessment Tasks Learning Outcomes
1 2 3 4 5
1 - Online Quiz(zes)    
2 - Written Assessment    
3 - Portfolio  

Alignment of Graduate Attributes to Learning Outcomes

  • Introductory Level
  • Intermediate Level
  • Graduate Level
Graduate Attributes Learning Outcomes
1 2 3 4 5
1. Communication
2. Problem Solving
3. Critical Thinking
4. Information Literacy
5. Team Work  
6. Information Technology Competence
7. Cross Cultural Competence
8. Ethical practice

Alignment of Assessment Tasks to Graduate Attributes

  • Introductory Level
  • Intermediate Level
  • Graduate Level
Assessment Tasks Graduate Attributes
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
1 - Online Quiz(zes)  
2 - Written Assessment        
3 - Portfolio  

Textbook Information

There are no required textbooks. Note: Readings are e-journal and Course Resource Online articles.

IT Resources

You will need access to the following IT resources:
  • CQUniversity Student Email
  • Internet
  • Unit Website (Moodle)
All submissions for this unit must use the Harvard (author-date) referencing style (details can be obtained here). For further information, see the Assessment Tasks below.
Unit CoordinatorSusan Rockloff (s.rockloff@cqu.edu.au)
Note: Check the Term-Specific section for any additional contact information provided by the teaching team
Week Begin Date Module/Topic Chapter Events and Submissions
Week 1 06-03-2017

Sociology, the sociological imagination & identity

Willis (2011) – CRO

Yuill, Gibson & Thorpe (2011) - CRO

Sullivan & Lane West-Newman (2007) - CRO

Week 2 13-03-2017 Australian rural society & rurality

Botterill (2006) e-journal

Week 3 20-03-2017

Rural culture & social conditions AND the global forces and politics in rural communities

Bryant & Garnham (2015) e-journal

Hogan & Lockie (2013) e-journ al

Woods (2006) e-journal

Week 4 27-03-2017 Rural health

Bourke et al. (2010) e-journal

Bourke et al. (2012) e-journal

Dixon & Welch (2000) e-journal

Week 5 03-04-2017 Health & wellbeing of Indigenous Australians in rural communities

McBain-Rigg & Veitch (2011) e-journal

Smith (2016) - CRO

See the Week 5 block on Moodle for further resources

Online quiz Due Friday (07 Apr 17) 10:00 PM AEST
Vacation Week 10-04-2017
Week 6 17-04-2017 Rural issues 1: Ageing, people with a disability & youth suicide

Bourke (2003) e-journal (youth)

Garnham & Bryant (2013) e-journal (ageing)

Week 7 24-04-2017

Rural issues 2: Rural women and DV & family violence

Grace & Lennie (1998) e-journal

Wendt (2009) e-journal

Week 8 01-05-2017

Rural issues 3: Migrant Ethnic minorites - diverse cultures & histories

Schech (2014) e-journal

Townsend & Pascal (2012) e-journal

Essay (1,600 words) Due Friday (05 May 17) 11:45 PM AEST
Week 9 08-05-2017

Living and working in rural, regional & remote Australia

Jervis-Tracey et al. (2012) e-journal

Keane, Lincoln &Smith (2012) e-journal

Week 10 15-05-2017 Working with Indigenous Australians in rural communities

Bennett, Zubrzycki & Bacon (2011)

Hooper, Thomas & Clarke (2007) e-journal

Walker & Sonn (2010) - internet article

See the Week 10 block on Moodle for further resources

Week 11 22-05-2017

Professional practice in rural areas

Beddoe & Burley (2012) - CRO

Bryant et al. (2015) e-journal

Week 12 29-05-2017

Opportunities & challenges of professional practice in rural communities

Dellemain & Warburton (2013) e-journal

Dew et al. (2012) e-journal

Portfolio (2,000 words) Due Friday (02 Jun 17) 11:45 PM AEST
Review/Exam Week 05-06-2017
Exam Week 12-06-2017

To be eligible to pass this unit all assessment items must be submitted for marking.

1 Online Quiz(zes)

Assessment Title Online quiz
Task Description
Task
You are required to complete an online multiple choice quiz of 40 questions in a time of 40 minutes (each question is worth half a mark).

What’s Involved?

The online quiz will be made available on the designated day through the unit website (Moodle). You require a computer that has internet access.

The quiz is set to test your understanding of sociological concepts, theories and facts covered by the unit readings, lecture notes and online weekly forum questions. It covers the unit content for weeks 1-5.

This is a timed online multiple choice quiz that must be completed on the due date between the hours of 8am and 10pm (Australian Eastern Standard Time). It will be delivered through the ‘Assessment’ section of Moodle, and will only become available on the due date and designated open time. It is your responsibility to make time to complete the quiz on the due date, and to arrange for a reliable Internet connection.

Before you take the quiz, make sure that you are ready (i.e. a proper revision has been done) and choose a time and computer/place with minimum distraction to sit for the quiz (i.e. do not have external disturbances from people, pets, etc). Be conscious of the time limit while taking the quiz—make sure you have a clock in front of you, and note down your starting time. Plan to have started the quiz by 9.00pm (AEST) to ensure full completion before the quiz closes down at 10pm (AEST).

There is only one correct or best answer to each question, and you need to select the option corresponding to this answer.

There are no penalties for incorrect answers.

While you will be able to refer to the textbook or other resources while you are taking the quiz, you cannot afford to do this for every question because of the time limit. You need to have a good understanding of the unit content before taking the quiz.

Each student will receive a customised quiz, chosen in random fashion, so that collusion will not be possible. The presentation of questions is ten questions at a time. You must answer the page of questions before you go on to the next one.

Remember to note the time when you start the quiz and pace yourself to ensure you have time to complete all the questions. Some practice multiple choice questions will be given to students on the Moodle site as an example.

IMPORTANT: The online quiz is avalable from 8am on the designated day and it closes at 10pm (AEST) which means you must commence your quiz at the latest by 9.20pm (AEST). It is recommended that you undertake the quiz early and leave yourself time in the event there is an unforseen problem.
In order to be eligible to pass the unit you must attempt and submit the quiz.
Please contact the Unit Coordinator and TaSAC by email if you experience any problems accessing or submitting your quiz.
Number of Quizzes 1
Assessment Due Date Week 5 Friday (07-Apr-2017) 10:00 PM AEST
Return Date to Students Vacation Week Monday (10-Apr-2017)
Weighting 20%
Assessment Criteria

Submission Online

Learning Outcomes Assessed
This section can be expanded to view the assessed learning outcomes

1. Use sociological theories and perspectives to discuss the impacts of global forces and historical changes on the social organisation of Australian rural society.

2. Identify the social-structural characteristics of rural areas and the factors (social, economic, cultural) that influence the health of rural Australians, and delivery of health care to rural and remote areas.

3. Describe the health issues experienced by Indigenous Australians and other social groups (e.g., new migrants, people living with disability) living in rural and remote communities.

Graduate Attributes
This section can be expanded to view the assessed graduate attributes

1. Communication

2. Problem Solving

3. Critical Thinking

4. Information Literacy

6. Information Technology Competence

7. Cross Cultural Competence

8. Ethical practice



2 Written Assessment

Assessment Title Essay (1,600 words)
Task Description

Task:You will complete a 1,600 word sociological essay using the sociological imagination (History, Structural, Cultural, Critique) to discuss your biography and identity. Using the sociological imagination template of Willis' explore your biography by reflecting on how what is normally seen as a series of life courses are part of broader social patterns and historical events. Spend some time thinking about your life in terms of history, and the social structures and cultural norms that have had the most impact on them.

Students will need to develop a discussion that is based on the sociological imagination template of the:

History (How one's life story is part of broader social patterns over time and place),

Structure (How have social structures impacted on your life history? - apply CAGES - Class, Age, Gender, Ethnicity, Sexuality), and

Culture (What cultural ideas are dominant in your life history?).

Critique (Reflection on your biography in relation to rural society). Look at your life history in relation to rural Australian society and its social, cultural and economic influences.This will form the essay conclusion.

The personal is cultural, historical and political, and we come to understand ourselves from a sociological position by asking "When, What and How am I?", as opposed to "Who am I?". Due to this you need to explore your identity by examining it in relation to social class, age (generation), gender, ethnicity, race and location.

Reflection allows you to look at your life and how your identity has been formed from past historical events, social patterns and the cultural context. Next think about yourself within the broader context of rural society. Sociology is a reflective practice which can be used to examine your different social identities (e.g., personal, professional), how they may be shaped and what you may experience in a rural community, as opposed to an urban community, as a result of those social identities.

Use the literature (journal articles, textbooks, etc.) to identify historical, structural and cultural patterns that have created your identity and reflect on your life history as experienced through various social institutions (e.g., family, education, work). You need to connect the private with the public, as put forth by Willis in his discussion of the sociological imagination.

The purpose of this reflective practice is to prepare you for professional practice in rural and remote communities, and to make you aware of the multiple, fluid and complex identities that you possess. Understanding your identity and how you see, and are seen in relation to the 'other', in the world will help you to better understand and manage your developing professional identity.Drawing from your biography and social identity, think about the social issues and health problems that you may experience if you were to live in a rural or remote community given your biography and identity.Furthermore, give some thought to the issues experienced by Indigenous Australians and other marginalised social groups in rural society.

Note:Use of sociological references to inform your answers is essential and failure to adhere to this requirement will result in an automatic FAIL grade (zero marks) for the assessment. Students must use the Harvard (author-date) referencing style (see the Harvard (author-date) style guide in the Assessment block).The word count (1,600 words +/- 10%) excludes references and direct quotes.

Please take time prior to the due date to discuss your essay and the key points covered with your unit coordinator. Students can also receive guidance on their sociological thinking and academic writing style prior to submission of the assessment. Students are asked not to post drafts of their work to the discussion forum but to instead bring ideas, examples and questions.

Assessment Due Date Week 8 Friday (05-May-2017) 11:45 PM AEST
Return Date to Students Week 10 Friday (19-May-2017)
Weighting 40%
Assessment Criteria
The Assessment Criteria are the same for Assessment 1 & 2. Please see the criteria given with Assessment 2 below or in the Assessment block of Moodle.
Referencing Style Harvard (author-date)
Submission Online

Please submit your assignment in a Word document format o enable marking and feedback comments.

Learning Outcomes Assessed
This section can be expanded to view the assessed learning outcomes

1. Use sociological theories and perspectives to discuss the impacts of global forces and historical changes on the social organisation of Australian rural society.

2. Identify the social-structural characteristics of rural areas and the factors (social, economic, cultural) that influence the health of rural Australians, and delivery of health care to rural and remote areas.

3. Describe the health issues experienced by Indigenous Australians and other social groups (e.g., new migrants, people living with disability) living in rural and remote communities.

Graduate Attributes
This section can be expanded to view the assessed graduate attributes

1. Communication

3. Critical Thinking

4. Information Literacy

6. Information Technology Competence



3 Portfolio

Assessment Title Portfolio (2,000 words)
Task Description
Task: Students must complete four (4) portfolio questions on the template provided in Moodle. Each answer response must be 500 words (+/-10%) for a total word count of 2,000 words (+/-10%). Each answer needs to show a word count at the end. Students are encouraged to use examples where possible in their answers.
A list of questions can be found on Moodle in the Assessment block. Each answer needs to: address the question, use relevant sociological concepts, reference sociological literature, show understanding of issues and key concepts, and provide a meaningful critique. The list of questions will be drawn from content covered in the unit.
Use of sociological references to inform your answers is mandatory and failure to adhere to this requirement will result in an automatic Fail grade (zero marks) for the assessment. Students must use the Harvard (author-date) referencing style (see the Harvard (author-date) style guide in the Assessment block).
Aim: The purpose of the portfolio is to get students to make connections between the course material and real life application and issues surrounding rural society, and working and living in rural communities in Australia.
The aim of this assessment is for you to demonstrate competency in the stated unit learning outcomes and facilitate online discussion amongst other students. Students are encouraged to discuss the questions with other students in the weekly discussion forums in order to expand their knowledge and learn from their peers. Through use of the discussion forums students will receive guidance and input from the Unit Coordinator on their sociological thinking and academic writing style prior to submission of this assignment. Students are asked not to post drafts of their work to the discussion forum but to bring ideas, examples and questions to the discussion. In the portfolio students are required to demonstrate that they have engaged with and understood the unit material, as opposed to repeating back information given in the lecture notes and set readings.
Note:The total word length for the portfolio is 2,000 words (+/-10%) and this count excludes the reference list and any direct quotes. For each answer provided only the first 550 words will be read and marked. Overuse of direct quotes detracts from the originality of the writing and will result in a loss of marks. As a general rule direct quotes should not comprise more than 10% of the word count. The writing standard expected of students is that of an advanced unit level and with academic style presentation.
Assessment Due Date Week 12 Friday (02-Jun-2017) 11:45 PM AEST
Return Date to Students Exam Week Friday (16-Jun-2017)
As per University policy marked assignments have a 14 day turnaround time.
Weighting 40%
Assessment Criteria

A copy of the criteria and marking sheet and Harvard (author-date) referencing style guide will also be available in the Assessment block on Moodle. It is strongly recommended that you refer to these documents in the preliminary stages of your assignment preparation and prior to submitting your work for marking.

Please contact your Unit Coordinator should you have any questions about any aspect of this portfolio or submission of your assignment by the due date and time.

Assessment criteria are provided below and you should refer to the assessment criteria and explanations when preparing the essay.

A summary of standards is provided on Moodle to assist students with feedback on assessment items.

Please contact the unit coordinator if you have any questions or are uncertain of what is required for the assessment. While the unit coordinator can not read and give comment on a draft assignment they can discuss with a student the arguments, ideas and theories used in the preparation of the assignment.

The following criteria will be used to grade the assignment (they are not of equal weighting):

Independent reading and research: You will be assessed on the extent, depth and relevance of your reading. You should make full use of the textbook and other readings, but it is essential that you do your own independent reading as well. This means making use of the library databases and catalogue and doing you own searches. Within the limitations of library resources, you should access the most relevant and most important works relating to your topic. It is difficult to provide exact requirements, but as a rough guide a major essay would contain at least ten references. These references should be mainly sociological books, book chapters, or journal articles; other sources may be used as appropriate to supplement these. In general the following types of sources should be avoided when writing essays—encyclopedias, popular magazines, newspapers (except for providing up-to-date information or real life examples), introductory sociology textbooks, ordinary dictionaries (use the definitions in a specialist source; in some cases a sociology dictionary may be appropriate) and general internet sites (those containing information not peer-reviewed). You should rely mainly on specialist sources—avoid general or popular sources, except perhaps to provide evidence which is not available in the more specialist sources. Where possible use the original source, or an equivalent one.

Relevance and structure of your argument: Your assignments should be relevant to the question or task set, and should be structured in a logical and coherent fashion. The essay needs to contain an introduction, discussion, conclusion and reference list. In the essay your argument should unfold in a clear and logical manner, with appropriate signposts for the reader. Subheadings may be used in the essay to help structure your writing. An introduction sets out how you are going to approach the topic—that is, it is a statement of intent, rather than of content. You should stick to the required word length. Being under the word limit usually indicates insufficient research; being over means you are having difficulty in focusing on the most relevant or most important points.

Use of supporting evidence: Except for purely theoretical essays, it is important that you back up your arguments with appropriate and solid evidence. There is no point in simply asserting that something is true, you need to substantiate your major claims with relevant concrete information, statistical or other. In general, this would be evidence derived from sociological works that you have come across in your reading, although this may need to be supplemented with other kinds of evidence (from the Australian Bureau of Statistics, for example).

Sociological insight and understanding: You will be assessed on your ability to understand and to apply relevant concepts, theories and methodologies. Depending on the assessment task, you may only refer to one or two perspectives in a particular piece of work, but it is important to know how the perspective you refer to relates to other possible perspectives within the field. Theories do not develop in isolation. New perspectives develop through modification of previous ones, or as critical reactions against them. To appreciate any one perspective, you need to understand how it relates to the alternatives (e.g. Labelling Theory in relation to Parsons' Sick Role). Thinking critically is an important skill which follows on from such appreciation. This means being able to assess the adequacy of the theoretical models being used by the writers you refer to, as well as the adequacy of the evidence they present to support these models. Purely descriptive accounts will not be acceptable.

Originality: To get a distinction or high distinction, there needs to be evidence of critical thinking and original thought. You are encouraged to create original arguments by analysing and evaluating the works of other people in the literature. Regardless of the grade you are aiming at, you should put things into your own words as much as possible, and structure the assignment in your own way.

Presentation: There is a certain standard of presentation which is expected at this unit level. This includes correct spelling, grammar, punctuation and referencing. If there are typographical errors in your assignments, you will lose marks. You should not use sexist, racist or other forms of discriminatory language.

Referencing: All evidence and all ideas which are not your own must be adequately acknowledged at the appropriate point in the text through the Harvard system of referencing, whether you are quoting directly or paraphrasing. You should familiarise yourself with the University policy on plagiarism. Plagiarism is defined in the Undergraduate Handbook, and is explained on the University’s library website. It is essential that you know your obligations in relation to presenting well documented and original work.

Referencing Style Harvard (author-date)
Submission Online

Students MUST submit their essay as a Word file to enable marking and comments to be added.

Learning Outcomes Assessed
This section can be expanded to view the assessed learning outcomes

1. Use sociological theories and perspectives to discuss the impacts of global forces and historical changes on the social organisation of Australian rural society.

2. Identify the social-structural characteristics of rural areas and the factors (social, economic, cultural) that influence the health of rural Australians, and delivery of health care to rural and remote areas.

4. Explain the role of the health professional working and living in rural and remote Australia, and the rewards and challenges this provides.

5. Compare and contrast the various health service delivery models used in rural and remote communities.

Graduate Attributes
This section can be expanded to view the assessed graduate attributes

1. Communication

2. Problem Solving

3. Critical Thinking

4. Information Literacy

6. Information Technology Competence

7. Cross Cultural Competence

8. Ethical practice




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