DFVP20002 - Domestic and Family Violence Responses and Interventions
Term 1 - 2017


All details in this unit profile for DFVP20002 have been officially approved by CQUniversity and represent a learning partnership between the University and you (our student). The information will not be changed unless absolutely necessary and any change will be clearly indicated by an approved correction included in the profile.

Overview

This unit will provide you with specialist knowledge of responses and interventions to domestic and family violence, with a focus on the concepts of risk and safety as they apply to victims and perpetrators in the domestic and family violence context. Critical use is made of evidence-based research and practice and policy documents addressing domestic and family violence issues. This will enable you to explore some of the complex practice and theoretical challenges that arise from working to prevent domestic and family violence at a community level and working with distinct client groups of victims and perpetrators. You will learn more about domestic and family violence as it affects people from vulnerable populations, such as Culturally and Linguistically Diverse (CALD) and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities. Legal and safety considerations that arise from working in this context and ethical, professional and self-management implications for practice are explored in this unit.

Details

Career Level Postgraduate
Credit Points 6
Student Contribution Band 1
Fraction of Full-Time Student Load 0.125

Attendance Requirements

All on-campus students are expected to attend scheduled classes – in some units, these classes are identified as a mandatory (pass/fail) component and attendance is compulsory. International students, on a student visa, must maintain a full time study load and meet both attendance and academic progress requirements in each study period (satisfactory attendance for International students is defined as maintaining at least an 80% attendance record).

Offerings

Term 1 - 2017
  • Distance

Website

This unit has a website, within the Moodle system, which is available two weeks before the start of term. It is important that you visit your Moodle site throughout the term. Go to Moodle

Recommended Student Time Commitment

Each 6-credit Postgraduate unit at CQUniversity requires an overall time commitment of an average of 12.5 hours of study per week, making a total of 150 hours for the unit.

Class Timetable

Assessment Overview

Assessment Task Weighting
1. Portfolio 50%
2. Written Assessment 50%

This is a graded unit: your overall grade will be calculated from the marks or grades for each assessment task, based on the relative weightings shown in the table above. You must obtain an overall mark for the unit of at least 50%, or an overall grade of ‘pass’ in order to pass the unit. If any ‘pass/fail’ tasks are shown in the table above they must also be completed successfully (‘pass’ grade). You must also meet any minimum mark requirements specified for a particular assessment task, as detailed in the ‘assessment task’ section (note that in some instances, the minimum mark for a task may be greater than 50%). Consult the University’s Grades and Results Procedures for more details of interim results and final grades.

All University policies are available on the IMPortal.

You may wish to view these policies:

  • Grades and Results Procedure
  • Assessment Policy and Procedure (Higher Education Coursework)
  • Review of Grade Procedure
  • Academic Misconduct Procedure
  • Monitoring Academic Progress (MAP) Policy and Procedure – Domestic Students
  • Monitoring Academic Progress (MAP) Policy and Procedure – International Students
  • Refund and Excess Payments (Credit Balances) Policy and Procedure
  • Student Feedback – Compliments and Complaints Policy and Procedure
  • Acceptable Use of Information and Communications Technology Facilities and Devices Policy and Procedure

This list is not an exhaustive list of all University policies. The full list of University policies are available on the IMPortal.

Feedback, Recommendations and Responses

Every unit is reviewed for enhancement each year. At the most recent review, the following staff and student feedback items were identified and recommendations were made.

Feedback Source Recommendation
Student feedback has been incorporated into Term 2 offerings. Course evaluations and course specific survey. Students have been provided with additional resources around assessment tasks, submission instructions and accessing feedback provided in Turnitin.
On successful completion of this unit, you will be able to:
  1. Identify and apply primary, secondary and tertiary prevention responses to domestic and family violence.
  2. Evaluate organisational structures and behaviours which are relevant to and impact upon domestic and family violence prevention and responses.
  3. Analyse and articulate the differences between perspectives on domestic and family violence.
  4. Identify treatment modalities for working with people experiencing/ perpetrating domestic violence with a focus on vulnerable populations.
  5. Self-reflect on values, ethics and perspectives in domestic and family violence contexts.

Alignment of Assessment Tasks to Learning Outcomes

Assessment Tasks Learning Outcomes
1 2 3 4 5
1 - Portfolio
2 - Written Assessment      

Alignment of Graduate Attributes to Learning Outcomes

  • Professional Level
  • Advanced Level
Graduate Attributes Learning Outcomes
1 2 3 4 5
1. Knowledge
2. Communication
3. Cognitive, technical and creative skills
4. Research
5. Self-management    
6. Ethical and Professional Responsibility  
7. Leadership  

Alignment of Assessment Tasks to Graduate Attributes

  • Professional Level
  • Advanced Level
Assessment Tasks Graduate Attributes
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
1 - Portfolio
2 - Written Assessment

Textbook Information

There are no required textbooks.

IT Resources

You will need access to the following IT resources:
  • CQUniversity Student Email
  • Internet
  • Unit Website (Moodle)
All submissions for this unit must use the American Psychological Association (APA) referencing style (details can be obtained here). For further information, see the Assessment Tasks below.
Unit CoordinatorSilke Meyer (s.meyer@cqu.edu.au)
Note: Check the Term-Specific section for any additional contact information provided by the teaching team
Week Begin Date Module/Topic Chapter Events and Submissions
Week 1 06-03-2017

Introduction

Pease, B. (2008). Engaging men in men’s violence prevention: exploring the tensions, dilemmas and possibilities, Issues Paper, 17, Sydney: Australian Domestic & Family Violence Clearinghouse. Retrieved from: http://www.xyonline.net/sites/default/files/Pease,%20Engaging%20men%20in%20men's%20violence%20prevention%2008.pdf

Week 2 13-03-2017 Key concepts: primary, secondary, tertiary prevention

World Health Organization. (2014). Global Status Report on Violence Prevention

Retrieved from

http://www.who.int/violence_injury_prevention/violence/status_report/2014/en/

Week 3 20-03-2017 Organisational structures

Bowstead, J.C. (2015). Why women’s domestic violence refuges are not local services, Critical Social Policy, 35 (3), 327-349, doi: 10.1177/0261018315588894.

Week 4 27-03-2017

Organisational behaviours

Humphreys, C. (2008). Problems in the system of mandatory reporting of children living with domestic violence, Journal of Family Studies, 14 (2-3), 228-239, DOI:10.5172/jfs.327.14.2-3.228.

Week 5 03-04-2017

Different perspectives on domestic and family violence

Leone, J.M., Johnson, M.P. and Cohan, C.L. (2007). Victim help-seeking: differences between intimate terrorism and situational couple violence, Family Relations, 56 (5), 427-439, DOI: 10.1111/j.1741-3729.2007.00471.

Portfolio item 1 due by 11:45pm Wednesday 05/04/2017

Vacation Week 10-04-2017
Week 6 17-04-2017

Responding to DFV: victims (1)

Eckhardt, C.I., Murphy, C.M., Whitaker, D.J. et al (2013). The effectiveness of intervention programs for perpetrators and victims of intimate partner violence, Partner Abuse, 4 (2), 196-231, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1891/1946-6560.4.2.196.

Week 7 24-04-2017

Responding to DFV: victims (2)

Meyer, S. (2014) Victims’ experiences of short- and long-term safety and wellbeing: Findings from an examination of an integrated response to domestic violence, Trends and Issues in Crime and Criminal Justice Series, No 478, Canberra: Australian Institute of Criminology (AIC). Retrieved from: http://search.informit.com.au/fullText;dn=420984536242378;res=IELHSS.

Week 8 01-05-2017

Responding to DFV: 'at risk populations'

Marchetti, E. (2010). Indigenous sentencing courts and partner violence: perspectives of court practitioners and elders on gender power imbalances during the sentencing hearing, The Australian and New Zealand Journal of Criminology, 43 (2), 263-281, doi: 10.1375/acri.43.2.263.

Portfolio item 2 due by 11:45pm on Wednesday 03/05/2017

Week 9 08-05-2017

Responding to DFV: perpetrators (1)

Day, A., Chung, D., O’Leary, P. and Carson, E. (2009). Programs for Men who Perpetrate Domestic Violence: An Examination of the Issues Underlying the Effectiveness of Intervention Programs, Journal of Family Violence, 24 (3), 203-212, DOI 10.1007/s10896-008-9221-4.

Week 10 15-05-2017

Responding to DFV: perpetrators (2)

Featherstone, B. and Peckover, S. (2007). Letting them get away with it: Fathers, domestic violence and child welfare, Critical Social Policy, 27(2), 181-202. http://ezproxy.cqu.edu.au/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=psyh&AN=2007-04814-002&site=eds-live&scope=site

Week 11 22-05-2017

Self-reflection: values, ethics, perspectives

Kondrat, M.E. (1999) Who Is the “Self” in Self-Aware: Professional Self-awareness from a Critical Theory Perspective, Social Service Review, 73 (4), 451-477. Retrieved from: http://ezproxy.cqu.edu.au/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=sih&AN=2657549&site=eds-live&scope=site

Written Assessment Due Wednesday (24 May 17) 11:45 PM AEST
Week 12 29-05-2017

Self-reflection: values, ethics, perspectives

Iliffe, G. & Steed, L.G. (2000). Exploring the Counselor’s Experience of Working With Perpetrators and Survivors of Domestic Violence, Journal of Interpersonal Violence, 15 (4), 393-412, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1891/0886-6708.23.2.133

Review/Exam Week 05-06-2017
Exam Week 12-06-2017

1 Portfolio

Assessment Title Portfolio
Task Description

Portfolio activities consist of different types of learning and assessment. They provide students with an opportunity to demonstrate a range of different skills, including different ways of researching, compiling and presenting information and acquired knowledge. The portfolio for DFVP20002 consists of two activities, which are to be submitted separately by 11:45pm on Wednesday of weeks 5 and 8 respectively. Each activity weighs 25% of the unit total. Submissions are staggered across Term 1 to enable you to obtain feedback on your progress throughout the unit.

Portfolio activities allow you to explore the research, relevant policy documents and practice guidelines underpinning the unit and link it to DFV-related practice. You will be required to write for a variety of audiences and purposes across the different assessment pieces in this unit.

Read each portfolio activity carefully and be aware of its specific requirements in terms of length, format, structure, required referencing, intended audience and purpose.

All assessment-related information is also made available on the unit Moodle site under the ‘ASSESSMENT’ block. You will also find a link to a monitored discussion board specifically designed for questions relating to each assessment item on the unit Moodle site. You are encouraged to monitor the unit Moodle site and your student emails for assessment-related information.

Portfolio Activity 1 (due Wednesday week 5 - 05/04/2017)

1000 words (+/- 10%); worth 25% of your overall unit assessment.

Two prevailing perspectives in the field of domestic and family violence practice are intimate partner terrorism and situational couple violence. These are also referred to as typologies and often surrounded by criticism associated with how service providers respond to DFV, how context and severity of DFV is assessed and recognised and whether victims and perpetrators of DFV are two distinct groups. Please note that other perspectives (or typologies) exist but should not form part of the discussion for this assessment piece.

For the purpose of this assessment piece, please highlight the key features of each perspective (or so-called typology) and identify core differences between them according to the empirical and theoretical literature surrounding these perspectives.

What implications do these two different perspectives have for service delivery for either victims or perpetrators of domestic and family violence? You only need to write about one of these client groups. You will need to identify and unpack how applying these perspectives to DFV and those affected by it may improve and/ or hinder service delivery for your chosen target population (victims or perpetrators). You should consider the following when structuring your assessment piece:

  • the nature of each perspective,

  • contentious issues associated with identifying prevalence rates,

  • benefits and challenges associated with framing/ understanding DFV under these perspectives,

  • implications for service delivery.

You should include a brief introduction and conclusion and at least five academic references.

Portfolio Activity 2 (due Wednesday week 8 - 03/05/2017)

1000 words (+/- 10%); worth 25% of your overall unit assessment.

“The issue of violence against women with disabilities is complex and profound. However, a proactive approach that is sensitive to the additional needs and vulnerabilities of these women can help to prevent further violence and increase safety.” (1800RESPECT, 2015)

In your role as the manager of a domestic and family violence support service you have been asked to provide a briefing document to your team on the delivery of an inclusive human services model for victims with disabilities.

You should describe your proposed strategies and provide a brief rationale for each strategy. Your proposal should be informed by contemporary ethical and practice guidelines, victim advocacy and research findings on good practice relating to service delivery for victims with disabilities. This should include a consideration of challenges, barriers and stigma associated with experiences of cognitive as well as physical disabilities. The focus of this briefing document is on good practice in human services delivery rather than alterations to physical environmental conditions (e.g. ramps and rails). In this assessment piece, you should deliver an informative brief to staff that explains and justifies critical aspects of inclusive service delivery, including an understanding of the barriers faced by victims with disabilities and how these can be addressed and overcome through good practice models.

The briefing document should provide staff with a brief introduction to the issue of DFV as it affects women with disabilities, challenges associated with additional layers of vulnerability, the promotion and delivery of inclusive service models and examples of what these should entail (e.g. from end-user-friendly information material and awareness raising to service accessibility and the possible need for holistic multi-agency responses).

References:

1800RESPECT. (2015). Violence and disability: What is it? 1800RESPECT, National Sexual Assault, Domestic Family Violence Counselling Service. Retrieved from: https://www.1800respect.org.au/workers/workplace-sectors/family-community-services/services-for-people-with-disabilities/women-with-disabilities-and-violence/

Assessment Due Date staggered; 11:45pm Wednesday of week 5 (05/04/2017), 11:45pm Wednesday of week 8 (03/05/2017); please ensure that you are familiar with the University's policy on late submissions.
Return Date to Students portfolio assessment pieces will be returned within one week of submission
Weighting 50%
Assessment Criteria

Domestic and Family Violence Theories and Perspectives DFVP20002 Assessment One:

Portfolio Activities 1 and 2

HD D C P F
Structure (15%)
Clear and succinct introduction and conclusion: they introduce the topic and outline the direction of the paper/ bring paper to logical close. Clear and appropriate introduction/ conclusion: they introduce the topic and outline the direction of the paper/ bring paper to a coherent close Appropriate introduction/ conclusion: they introduce the topic and outline the direction of the paper/ bring paper to a close Introduction is apparent and the topic is introduced but there is no clear direction to the paper/ conclusion apparent but may not entirely cover all points of paper No recognisable introduction-the topic is not introduced and/or there is no direction of the paper/ no clear conclusion
Excellent presentation of assignment, double spaced with 12 point font. Consistently accurate with spelling, grammar and paragraph structure. Well-presented assignment, double spaced with 12 point font. 1 or 2 errors spelling, grammar and paragraph structure. Well-presented assignment, double spaced with 12 point font. 3 or 4 consistent errors with spelling, grammar and paragraph structure. Well-presented assignment, double spaced with 12 point font. 3 or 4 inconsistent errors with spelling, grammar and paragraph structure Poorly presented assignment. Double spacing not used. 12 point font not used. Many inaccuracies with spelling, grammar and paragraph structure. (> 5 errors).
Approach and Argument (70%)
Content is entirely relevant to the topic, the approach comprehensively addresses the task and the argument proceeds logically and is within the set word limit. ACTIVITY ONE (Learning Outcome 3) Key features of each perspective have been highlighted: intimate partner terrorism and situational couple violence. Core differences between perspectives have been identified. Implications for service delivery for either victims or perpetrators of domestic and family violence have been addressed. ACTIVITY TWO (Learning Outcomes 2, 4) Proposed strategies for the delivery of an inclusive human services model for victims with disabilities are articulated. There is a brief rationale for each strategy. Cotemporary ethical and practice guidelines, victim advocacy and research findings on good practice underpin the paper. Content is very relevant to the topic, the approach clearly addresses the task and the argument proceeds logically and is within the set word limit Content is mostly appropriate to the topic, the approach mostly addresses the task and the argument for the most part proceeds logically and is within the set word limit Content addresses the task but the argument is at times repetitive or lacks cohesion and is within the set word limit with a 10% allowance (under or over the set limit) Content is irrelevant and or does not address the task and the argument lacks cohesion. The word limit has not been adhered to, the word limit is well over or under the 10% allowance
Referencing (15%)
Consistently integrates up-to-date references to support and reflect all ideas, factual information and quotations. Generally integrates up-to-date references to support and reflect ideas, factual information and quotations, with 1 or 2 exceptions Partly integrates up-to-date references to support and reflect ideas, factual information and quotations, with 3 or 4 exceptions Occasionally integrates up-to-date references to support and reflect ideas, factual information and quotations, with 5 or 6 exceptions Fails to or infrequent attempts (>7 errors) to integrate up-to-date references to support and reflect ideas, factual information and quotations
Consistently accurate with referencing. A minimum of 5 references used including journal articles and relevant web-sites. 1 or 2 consistent referencing errors identified. A minimum of 5 references used including journal articles and relevant web-sites. 3 or 4 consistent referencing errors identified. A minimum of 5 references used including journal articles and relevant web-sites. 3 or 4 inconsistent referencing errors identified. A minimum of 5 references used including journal articles and relevant web-sites. Many inaccuracies with referencing (>5). Less than 5 references used. Few or no journal articles sourced. Relevant web-sites not included.

Conditions Minimum mark or grade - 10/50
Referencing Style American Psychological Association (APA)
Submission Online

assessment pieces have to be submitted via turnitin; please ensure you are familiar with CQU's turnitin submission and feedback process

Learning Outcomes Assessed
This section can be expanded to view the assessed learning outcomes

1. Identify and apply primary, secondary and tertiary prevention responses to domestic and family violence.

2. Evaluate organisational structures and behaviours which are relevant to and impact upon domestic and family violence prevention and responses.

3. Analyse and articulate the differences between perspectives on domestic and family violence.

4. Identify treatment modalities for working with people experiencing/ perpetrating domestic violence with a focus on vulnerable populations.

5. Self-reflect on values, ethics and perspectives in domestic and family violence contexts.

Graduate Attributes
This section can be expanded to view the assessed graduate attributes

1. Knowledge

2. Communication

3. Cognitive, technical and creative skills

4. Research

5. Self-management

6. Ethical and Professional Responsibility

7. Leadership



2 Written Assessment

Assessment Title Written Assessment
Task Description

Written Assignment - Essay (2,500 words; +/-10%)

You are required to write an essay which provides you with an opportunity to thoroughly investigate and critique a key issue in domestic and family violence practice: integrated service responses to DFV.

Australia’s National Research Organisation for Women’s Safety (ANROWS, 2015 p 15) highlighted in a recent State of Knowledge paper that:

To be effective, responses to violence against women need to involve the resources of crisis and long term counselling and support, safety planning, health and mental health services, criminal justice, housing and employment services. In that respect, all effective responses to violence against women must be integrated.

For this essay you will need to review national and international literature on ‘best practice’ in integrated responses to domestic and family violence.

You should:

  • Define the term ‘integrated response’ and provide a rigorous examination of what constitutes a truly ‘integrated response’ model.
  • Identify what makes a truly integrated response model ‘best practice’.
  • Analyse and critically examine how this is different from so-called interagency responses, collaborative responses or partnership responses.
  • Identify challenges associated with forming integrated responses to DFV (e.g. agency specific, legislative and/ or at a collaborative level) and how these might be overcome.
  • Consider the benefits of integrated responses for victims, perpetrators and services involved.
  • Identify relevant considerations to ensure adequate responses to highly vulnerable population groups (e.g. what does the evidence base have to say about adequately responding to ‘at risk populations’, such as victims or perpetrators from CALD backgrounds, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander victims or perpetrators, victims or perpetrators with a disability, victims or perpetrators in same-sex relationships). You do not need to address relevant considerations relating to each of these vulnerable populations. Instead, you should identify some ‘key ingredients’ of best practice models that do not solely cater for mainstream populations.

You should include at least fifteen references in your essay. At least eight of these should be academic references based on empirical and/ or theoretical examinations of the issues implicit in this statement. Remaining references may be sources from the grey literature and relevant practice guidelines. Please avoid using individual service provider website information as a reference unless these link to published report or service manuals.

Reference:

Australia’s National Research Organisation for Women’s Safety (ANROWS). Meta-evaluation of existing interagency partnerships, collaboration, coordination and/ or integrated interventions and service responses to violence against women: State of knowledge paper. Landscapes, September 2015. Retrieved from http://media.aomx.com/anrows.org.au/s3fs-public/Integrated%20Responses%20Meta-Evaluation%20-Landscapes%20(State%20of%20knowledge)%20Issue%20Eleven.pdf

All assessment-related information is also made available on the course Moodle site under the ‘ASSESSMENT’ block. You will also find a link to a monitored discussion board specifically designed for questions relating to each assessment item on the course Moodle site. You are encouraged to monitor the course Moodle site and your student emails for assessment-related information.

Assessment Due Date Week 11 Wednesday (24-May-2017) 11:45 PM AEST
please ensure that you're familiar with the University's policy on late submissions
Return Date to Students written assignments will be returned within two weeks of submission
Weighting 50%
Assessment Criteria
HD D C P F
Structure (15%)
Clear and succinct introduction that introduces the topic and outlines the direction of the paper. Clear and appropriate introduction that introduces the topic and outlines the direction of the paper Appropriate introduction that introduces the topic and outlines the direction of the paper Introduction is apparent and the topic is introduced but there is no clear direction to the paper No recognisable introduction-the topic is not introduced and/or there is no direction of the paper
Clear and succinct conclusion that outlines the main points brings argument to a logical close. Clear and appropriate conclusion that outlines the main points and brings the argument to a close Conclusion outlines most of the main points and brings some sense of closure Conclusion apparent and outlines most of the main points and endeavours to bring the argument to a close-there may be some incongruity No recognisable conclusion-little reference to the main points and no clear conclusion to the paper.
Excellent presentation of assignment, double spaced with 12 point font. Consistently accurate with spelling, grammar and paragraph structure. Well-presented assignment, double spaced with 12 point font. 1 or 2 errors spelling, grammar and paragraph structure. Well-presented assignment, double spaced with 12 point font. 3 or 4 consistent errors with spelling, grammar and paragraph structure. Well-presented assignment, double spaced with 12 point font. 3 or 4 inconsistent errors with spelling, grammar and paragraph structure Poorly presented assignment. Double spacing not used. 12 point font not used. Many inaccuracies with spelling, grammar and paragraph structure. (> 5 errors).
Approach & Argument (70%)
Overall, content is entirely relevant to the topic, the approach comprehensively addresses the task and the argument proceeds logically and is within the set word limit. Overall, content is very relevant to the topic, the approach clearly addresses the task and the argument proceeds logically and is within the set word limit Overall, content is appropriate and addresses and the argument for the most part proceeds logically and is within the set word limit Overall, content addresses the task but the argument is at times repetitive or lacks cohesion and is within the set word limit with a 10% allowance (under or over the set limit) Overall, content is irrelevant and or does not address the task and the argument lacks cohesion. The word limit has not been adhered to, the word limit is well over or under the 10% allowance
An articulate and comprehensive analysis and demonstrated understanding of what constitutes a truly ‘integrated response’ model. (Learning Outcome 2) Insightful and well-developed analysis and demonstrated understanding of what constitutes a truly ‘integrated response’ model. A logical analysis and demonstrated understanding of what constitutes a truly ‘integrated response’ model. A disjointed discussion that demonstrates a generalised or limited understanding of what constitutes a truly ‘integrated response’ model. An inadequate discussion demonstrating a poor understanding of what constitutes a truly ‘integrated response’ model.
A careful and critical analysis of how an integrated response differs from interagency responses, collaborative responses or partnership responses. (Learning Outcome 2) Insightful and well-developed analysis that demonstrates an understanding of how an integrated response differs from interagency responses, collaborative responses or partnership responses. A logical analysis that demonstrates sound understanding of how an integrated response differs from interagency responses, collaborative responses or partnership responses. A disjointed discussion that demonstrates a generalised or limited understanding of how an integrated response differs from interagency responses, collaborative responses or partnership responses. An inadequate discussion demonstrating a poor understanding of how an integrated response differs from interagency responses, collaborative responses or partnership responses.
The identification of what makes a truly integrated response model ‘best practice’ is extremely well-articulated, synthesising high-quality national and international research. (Learning Outcome 2) High-quality national and international literature have been integrated into a clear identification of what makes a truly integrated response model ‘best practice’. National and international literature have been integrated into a sound identification of what makes a truly integrated response model ‘best practice. This is an identification of what makes a truly integrated response model ‘best practice’, drawing on some national and international literature. The paper would benefit from selecting more relevant literature as its basis. There is no apparent identification of what makes a truly integrated response model ‘best practice’. There has been no quality literature sourced to inform this aspect of the paper.
The benefits of integrated responses for victims, perpetrators and services involved are clearly and logically explained, reflecting mastery of this element of the paper. High-quality national and international literature has been synthesised expertly. (Learning Outcomes 2, 4) The benefits of integrated responses for victims, perpetrators and services involved are clearly explained, reflecting very good understanding of this element of the paper. High-quality national and international literature has been integrated very well into this element. The benefits of integrated responses for victims, perpetrators and services involved are clearly explained, reflecting good understanding of this element of the paper. High-quality national and international literature has been synthesised well into this element. The benefits of integrated responses for victims, perpetrators and services involved are partly explained, reflecting some understanding of this element of the paper. There is evidence of sourcing national and international literature to address this element. There is no analysis of the benefits of this approach for victims, perpetrators and/ or services involved . There is little/ no evidence of research of this aspect of the paper.
There is a very clear identification of potential gaps in sufficiently addressing the needs of highly vulnerable population groups. At least one example (CALD, Indigenous, disability groups, same-sex couples) has been applied with great skill to demonstrate advanced understanding of the issues relating to highly vulnerable populations. (Learning Outcome 2, 4) There is a clear identification of potential gaps in sufficiently addressing the needs of highly vulnerable population groups. At least one example (CALD, Indigenous, disability groups, same-sex couples) has been applied with skill to demonstrate very good understanding of the issues relating to highly vulnerable populations. There is an identification of potential gaps in sufficiently addressing the needs of highly vulnerable population groups. At least one example (CALD, Indigenous, disability groups, same-sex couples) has been applied with skill to demonstrate good understanding of the issues. There is an identification of potential gaps in sufficiently addressing the needs of highly vulnerable population groups. This paper would benefit from a more discerning use of an example (CALD, Indigenous, disability groups, same-sex couples) to demonstrate a sound understanding of the issues. There is no identification of potential gaps in sufficiently addressing the needs of highly vulnerable population groups. Examples (CALD, Indigenous, disability groups, same-sex couples) have not been used/ used well to demonstrate understanding of the issues.
Referencing (15%)
Consistently integrates up-to-date references to support and reflect all ideas, factual information and quotations. Generally integrates up-to-date references to support and reflect ideas, factual information and quotations, with 1 or 2 exceptions Partly integrates up-to-date references to support and reflect ideas, factual information and quotations, with 3 or 4 exceptions Occasionally integrates up-to-date references to support and reflect ideas, factual information and quotations, with 5 or 6 exceptions Fails to or infrequent attempts (>7 errors) to integrate up-to-date references to support and reflect ideas, factual information and quotations
Consistently accurate with referencing. A minimum of 15 references used including 8 journal articles and relevant grey literature. 1 or 2 consistent referencing errors identified. A minimum of 15 references used including 7 journal articles and relevant grey literature. 3 or 4 consistent referencing errors identified. A minimum of 15 references used including 6 journal articles and relevant grey literature. 3 or 4 inconsistent referencing errors identified. A minimum of 15 references used including 5 journal articles and relevant grey literature. Many inaccuracies with referencing (>5). Less than 15 references used. Less than 5 journal articles not sourced. Relevant grey literature not included.
Conditions Minimum mark or grade - 10/50
Referencing Style American Psychological Association (APA)
Submission Online

assignments must be submitted through turnitin; students are required to familiarise themselves with CQU's turnitin submission and feedback guidelines

Learning Outcomes Assessed
This section can be expanded to view the assessed learning outcomes

2. Evaluate organisational structures and behaviours which are relevant to and impact upon domestic and family violence prevention and responses.

4. Identify treatment modalities for working with people experiencing/ perpetrating domestic violence with a focus on vulnerable populations.

Graduate Attributes
This section can be expanded to view the assessed graduate attributes

1. Knowledge

2. Communication

3. Cognitive, technical and creative skills

4. Research

5. Self-management

6. Ethical and Professional Responsibility

7. Leadership




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