DGTL12009 - Game Development
Term 2 - 2017


All details in this unit profile for DGTL12009 have been officially approved by CQUniversity and represent a learning partnership between the University and you (our student). The information will not be changed unless absolutely necessary and any change will be clearly indicated by an approved correction included in the profile.

Overview

This unit builds on the foundation provided by the prerequisite unit to further develop your skills and knowledge in game design and development. You will learn about key elements of the game industry, platforms and genres. Through a combination of theory and practice, you will learn how to develop a game prototype, conduct an effective playtest, evaluate feedback, and revise a game’s design. You will also learn how to communicate game designs to others using appropriate documentation.

Details

Career Level Undergraduate
Unit Level Level 2
Credit Points 6
Student Contribution Band 2
Fraction of Full-Time Student Load 0.125

Pre-requisites or Co-requisites

Prerequisite: MMST12017 Game Design

Attendance Requirements

All on-campus students are expected to attend scheduled classes – in some units, these classes are identified as a mandatory (pass/fail) component and attendance is compulsory. International students, on a student visa, must maintain a full time study load and meet both attendance and academic progress requirements in each study period (satisfactory attendance for International students is defined as maintaining at least an 80% attendance record).

Offerings

Term 2 - 2017
  • Brisbane
  • Bundaberg
  • Distance
  • Mackay
  • Noosa
  • Rockhampton

Website

This unit has a website, within the Moodle system, which is available two weeks before the start of term. It is important that you visit your Moodle site throughout the term. Go to Moodle

Recommended Student Time Commitment

Each 6-credit Undergraduate unit at CQUniversity requires an overall time commitment of an average of 12.5 hours of study per week, making a total of 150 hours for the unit.

Class Timetable

Assessment Overview

Assessment Task Weighting
1. Practical and Written Assessment 30%
2. Practical and Written Assessment 30%
3. Practical and Written Assessment 40%

This is a graded unit: your overall grade will be calculated from the marks or grades for each assessment task, based on the relative weightings shown in the table above. You must obtain an overall mark for the unit of at least 50%, or an overall grade of ‘pass’ in order to pass the unit. If any ‘pass/fail’ tasks are shown in the table above they must also be completed successfully (‘pass’ grade). You must also meet any minimum mark requirements specified for a particular assessment task, as detailed in the ‘assessment task’ section (note that in some instances, the minimum mark for a task may be greater than 50%). Consult the University’s Grades and Results Procedures for more details of interim results and final grades.

All University policies are available on the IMPortal.

You may wish to view these policies:

  • Grades and Results Procedure
  • Assessment Policy and Procedure (Higher Education Coursework)
  • Review of Grade Procedure
  • Academic Misconduct Procedure
  • Monitoring Academic Progress (MAP) Policy and Procedure – Domestic Students
  • Monitoring Academic Progress (MAP) Policy and Procedure – International Students
  • Refund and Excess Payments (Credit Balances) Policy and Procedure
  • Student Feedback – Compliments and Complaints Policy and Procedure
  • Acceptable Use of Information and Communications Technology Facilities and Devices Policy and Procedure

This list is not an exhaustive list of all University policies. The full list of University policies are available on the IMPortal.

On successful completion of this unit, you will be able to:
  1. explain key elements of the game industry, platforms and genres
  2. develop a game prototype, applying the theories, methods and process of game design
  3. playtest a game prototype, evaluate feedback, and revise a game’s design
  4. communicate game designs to others using appropriate documentation.

Not applicable

Alignment of Assessment Tasks to Learning Outcomes

Assessment Tasks Learning Outcomes
1 2 3 4
1 - Practical and Written Assessment    
2 - Practical and Written Assessment    
3 - Practical and Written Assessment  

Alignment of Graduate Attributes to Learning Outcomes

  • Introductory Level
  • Intermediate Level
  • Graduate Level
Graduate Attributes Learning Outcomes
1 2 3 4
1. Communication
2. Problem Solving  
3. Critical Thinking
4. Information Literacy
5. Team Work  
6. Information Technology Competence
7. Cross Cultural Competence
8. Ethical practice

Alignment of Assessment Tasks to Graduate Attributes

  • Introductory Level
  • Intermediate Level
  • Graduate Level
Assessment Tasks Graduate Attributes
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
1 - Practical and Written Assessment    
2 - Practical and Written Assessment
3 - Practical and Written Assessment

Prescribed Textbooks

Game Design Workshop: A Playcentric Approach to Creating Innovative Games
Author/s: Tracy Fullerton Year: 2014
Edition: Third Edn Publisher: CRC Press
City: Boca Raton State: Florida
Country: United States of America
View textbooks at the CQUniversity Bookshop
Note:

The textbook is a print on-demand title, and occasionally their are lags in the printing cycle which may result in delayed orders.

An alternative option is the purchase of a digital eBook version which is immediately available through Amazon.com for use with Kindle.

The CQ University library holds limited paper copies for student use, but a restricted digital version is also available.

IT Resources

You will need access to the following IT resources:
  • CQUniversity Student Email
  • Internet
  • Unit Website (Moodle)
  • Unity3D - www.unity3d.com. Require at least v5.5 as a minimum (current stable build is v5.6.1)
  • Construct 2 - www.scirra.com. CQU have 80x licenses available for student issue, and already installed in CQU Labs (not available for Mac)
  • Twine - https://twinery.org. Available for Windows, Mac and also available Online (Browser-based)
  • Squiffy - http://textadventures.co.uk/squiffy. Available for Windows, Mac and also available Online (Browser-based)
  • Piskel - http://www.piskelapp.com. Available for Windows, Mac and also available Online (Browser-based). Also installed in CQU Labs.
  • Adobe Creative Cloud Suite - http://www.adobe.com/au/creativecloud/buy/students.html. As a minimum, students will require access to Photoshop, Illustrator and Audition.
All submissions for this unit must use the Harvard (author-date) referencing style (details can be obtained here). For further information, see the Assessment Tasks below.
Unit CoordinatorJames Picton (j.picton@cqu.edu.au)
Note: Check the Term-Specific section for any additional contact information provided by the teaching team
Week Begin Date Module/Topic Chapter Events and Submissions
Week 1 10-07-2017

Review of Game Design Basics

Fullerton, T 2014, Chapter 2: The Structure of Games, CRC Press, 2014.

Hunicke, R, LeBlanc, M & Zubek, R 2004, MDA: A Formal Approach to Game Design and Game Research, viewed 28 January 2017, http://www.cs.northwestern.edu/~hunicke/MDA.pdf

Week 2 17-07-2017

Self-Promotion & Networking

Fullerton, T 2014, Chapter 16: Selling yourself & your ideas to the Game Industry, CRC Press, 2014.

Week 3 24-07-2017

The Development Team

Fullerton, T 2014, Chapter 12: Team Structure, in Game Design Workshop, CRC Press, 2014.

Week 4 31-07-2017 The Development Lifecycle

Fullerton, T 2014, Chapter 13: Stages and Methods of Development, CRC Press, 2014.

Week 5 07-08-2017

Gameworld Considerations

Game Pitch Video and Individual Development Blog (Weeks 1-4) Due Friday (11 Aug 17) 11:45 PM AEST
Vacation Week 14-08-2017
Week 6 21-08-2017

Play-testing

Fullerton, T 2014, Chapter 9, Playtesting, CRC Press, 2014.

Week 7 28-08-2017

Fine-Tuning your Game System

Fullerton, T 2014, Chapter 10, Functionality Completeness & Balance, CRC Press, 2014.

Game Design Document (GDD) & Gantt Chart, and Individual Development Blog (Weeks 5-7) Due Friday (01 Sep 17) 11:45 PM AEST
Week 8 04-09-2017

Fun for Everyone: Creating Inclusive Games

Fullerton, T 2014, Chapter 11, Fun & Accessibility, CRC Press, 2014.

Week 9 11-09-2017

The New Game Industry

Fullerton, T 2014, Chapter 15: Understanding the New game Industry, CRC Press, 2014.

Week 10 18-09-2017

Gamification in Other Contexts

Week 11 25-09-2017

The Future of Games

Week 12 02-10-2017

Review

Published Game, Marketing Strategy & Individual Development Blog (Weeks 8-11) Due Friday (06 Oct 17) 11:45 PM AEST
Review/Exam Week 09-10-2017
Exam Week 16-10-2017

Overview

This unit has three distinct, but concurrent, assessment tasks which reflect authentic stages in the game development process.

The tasks are:

  • Pitching your team's idea to gain support from investors, peer developers & your target audience
  • Documenting your processes to keep game development on track
  • Delivering a tested game product to the market & growing your audience

Unlike MMST12017 Game Design where the focus was on the development of individual skills & knowledge, this unit requires students to work collaboratively in small development teams. Working together, students will harness their strengths to transform an existing MMST12017 digital prototype into a high-quality, complete game which will be deployed to a publicly accessible game portal. Additionally, students will implement a basic marketing strategy and develop a supporting Facebook page to spread 'buzz' about the game.

Game Development: SWOT Analysis

Turning a prototype game into a game worthy of publishing is a time-intensive and challenging process. Therefore, students will work in teams of two, and focus on the development of a previously-developed MMST12017 digital prototype game. You will use SWOT Analysis (Strengths Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats) to determine which of the two games offers the most potential for development and marketing.

Game Development Platforms: Catering for Diversity

Students entering this unit will have a common understanding of game design theory, but different experiences with 2D game development software. Students who completed MMST12017 in 2015 used ActionScript3; students from 2016 built prototypes using Construct 2, whilst students who undertook studies this year were exposed to Unity. To account for this diverse audience, students will be provided with a couple of game development software options. Game engine choices include:

1. Construct 2 (PC Only)

The Construct 2 game engine was used by MMST12017 students in 2016.

a. CQU TaSAC (IT Support) hold licenses for the 'full edition' and will issue these to students upon request

b. Curently installed in CQUniversity computer labs

c. Pseudocode environment (coding with blocks)

d. Website: Construct2

2. Construct 3 (Cross-platform – PC/Mac/Online)

This is an updated version of Construct. If you wish to use this version of Construct you will need to purchase an educational license.

a. 30 day demo version of this software is available online

b. Students can purchase a 1 year education license for $54.09 (CQUniversity do NOT hold licenses for this software)

c. Pseudocode environment (coding with blocks)

d. Website: Construct3

3. Unity 5.5+ Personal Edition (PC/Mac)

Unity was used by MMST12017 Students during 2017.

a. Free for personal/home use

b. Currently installed in CQUniversity computer labs

c. Code-intensive environment, although simplified frameworks such as the Playground Project can be used

d. Website: Unity


4. Twine (PC/Mac/Online)

Twine supports the creating of hypertext 'interactive fiction' games (also referred to as 'game books').

a. Web-based narrative game engine

b. Text, branching, HTML, CSS, JavaScript and media support

c. Website: Twine

Supplementary Notes:

  • Students will be given some time to explore these engines during the Week 1 tutorial, and will be expected to review and select a game development engine by the end of Week 2.
  • As the game development tasks are collaborative (replicating the 'real world' experience) students are expected to have formed a team with another student by the end of Week 2.
  • Regardless of your team's software selection, the assessment tasks, considerations and expectations are identical. There is no 'easier' option and all platforms carry the same assessment expectations.
  • Tutors may not have specific knowledge of all game development engines: some may have used Construct 2, whilst others have used Unity.
  • Twine is provided as an alternative to teams who may wish to try their hand at an interactive-fiction game. Twine simply requires familiarisation with the authoring engine, along with an understanding of basic HTML and CSS. Additional functionality can be developed using JavasScript, if required. As this is a level 2 subject, students already have the foundation HTML/CSS/JS knowledge due to completing the core Web Design unit in their first year of studies.
  • The endstate for this course is that the completed team game will be uploaded to an online game publishing portal, for access and feedback by the public.

1 Practical and Written Assessment

Assessment Title Game Pitch Video and Individual Development Blog (Weeks 1-4)
Task Description

Assignment 1: Game Pitch Video and Development Blog (Weeks 1-4)

Synopsis

This assessment task contains two components:

1. Game Pitch Video (Max 3 minutes)

2. Development Blog (Weeks 1-4)

1. Game Pitch Video: Team Task

Overview

Mode: Team task

Objective: Develop a three-minute video which promotes your team's game to potential partners, investors and team members, whilst generating 'buzz' (excitement) within the marketplace.

Constraints: Maximum length of video is 3 minutes. Completed video to be uploaded to a team YouTube or Vimeo channel (which you must create).

Task

  • Develop an elevator pitch of between 2.5-3 minutes (must not exceed 3 minutes)
  • Video must include both team members
  • Video must include artwork relevant to your game development
  • Video is to be a 'general purpose' pitch which presents your game in an engaging, interesting but informative manner (the aim is to build excitement, generate interest & inform)
  • The target audience for your video could include investors, publishers, potential development team members and gamers
  • Completed video to be uploaded to team YouTube/Vimeo channel
  • URL link to be uploaded using the Moodle Assignment 1 submission page

2. Development Blog (Weeks 1-4): Individual Task

Mode: Individual task

Objective: Maintain a weekly Moodle blog covering Weeks 1-4

Style: Informal writing (not academic), short video or audio.

Constraints:

  • Use the supplied Moodle blog tool
  • Create 1x blog post each week critically reflecting on your involvement in the team game development process
  • Blog does NOT need to be written, video or audio responses are acceptable
  • There is no minimum word length, but your blog posts should be of sufficient length to cover your topic.

Weekly Blog Topics:

  • Week 1 - free choice
  • Week 2 - free choice
  • Week 3 - critically reflect on your SWOT Analysis i.e. the process of selecting the game design for your team (i.e. what shaped your thinking; did you agree; how did you negotiate?)
  • Week 4 - critically reflect on your role in the development of the game pitch video (i.e. how have you contributed?)

Free-choice Blog suggestions:

  • What have you learned that you didn't know already?
  • Relevance of your weekly tasks to game design theory
  • Things that have inspired or motivated you (e.g. games, movies, books, tv, ideas)
  • Challenges that you have encountered (i.e. which areas have proved the most difficult?)
  • Problems that have arisen, and how you overcame them
  • Research & development (i.e. what have you done to expand your knowledge of game development?)
  • Examples of content that you are producing in support of the game
  • Team dynamics
  • Game development progress

Assessment Due Date Week 5 Friday (11-Aug-2017) 11:45 PM AEST
Return Date to Students Week 7 Friday (01-Sep-2017)
Weighting 30%
Assessment Criteria

The assessment criteria for Assignment 1 are summarised below:

  • Game Pitch Video - Team Task:
    • Team Task
    • Deliver a complete Game Pitch video of between 2.5 - 3 minutes duration
    • Video must meet the constraints identified in the brief
  • Development Blog (Weeks 1-4) - Individual Task:
    • Individual Task.
    • Complete one entry per week during Weeks 1-4 using the individual Game Development Blog on the course Moodle site (located in the 'Assessment' block in the left-hand menu)
    • Drawing from the designated topics, students are to individually create 1x blog post each week critically reflecting on your involvement in the team game development process
    • There is no word limit for the blog posts, but they must sufficiently cover the topic
    • Blog posts can be delivered in written, video or audio format
    • Refer to the course Moodle site for specific information about the expectations for your journal
  • Allocation of marks:
    • Game Pitch Video - 24 marks
    • Development Blog (Weeks 1-4) - 6 marks
  • Supplementary Notes:
    • All media components developed for the finished game must be original (with the exception of code / scripts that are in the public domain)
    • Any public domain code that you employ MUST be referenced correctly
    • You must not use someone else's Intellectual Property (IP) within your work e.g. Star Wars is George Lucas' idea, not yours. Ergo, all components, or spin-offs from this universe, are also dependent on his IP
    • Evidence of successful experimentation and innovation will result in higher marks
    • Penalties will be applied for late submission, or failing to comply with assessment requirements
    • Please refer to the DGTL12009 Moodle site for more detailed assessment criteria
Referencing Style Harvard (author-date)
Submission Online
Group submission

Provide a hyperlink to your team's Video Pitch (which has been uploaded to a team Vimeo/Youtube channel)

Learning Outcomes Assessed
This section can be expanded to view the assessed learning outcomes

1. explain key elements of the game industry, platforms and genres

4. communicate game designs to others using appropriate documentation.

Graduate Attributes
This section can be expanded to view the assessed graduate attributes

1. Communication

3. Critical Thinking

4. Information Literacy

6. Information Technology Competence

7. Cross Cultural Competence

8. Ethical practice



2 Practical and Written Assessment

Assessment Title Game Design Document (GDD) & Gantt Chart, and Individual Development Blog (Weeks 5-7)
Task Description

Assignment 2: Game Design Document (GDD) & Gantt Chart, and Development Blog (Weeks 5-7)

Synopsis

This assessment task contains two components:

1. Game Design Document & Gantt Chart

2. Development Blog (Weeks 5-7)

1. Game Design Document (GDD) & Gantt Chart: Team Task

Overview

Mode: Team task

Objective: Deliver a complete and accurate Game Design Document (GDD) and supporting Gantt Chart that provides a clear roadmap for your team's game development process.

Constraints:

  • You must use the supplied GDD template
  • You will be provided a link to a Game Development Dashboard, which includes a Gantt Chart. However, you may create your own Gantt Chart should your prefer
  • A Gantt Chart MUST be provided to support your GDD

Task

The Game Design Document (GDD) is a dynamic and evolving 'bible' which is constantly referred to, and shaped by, the game designer's interactions with team members during the life of the project. It's important to recognise that there is no 'one way' to create a GDD. Often, the format chosen by game design teams is a matter of preference, or it could be enforced by company doctrine.

Regardless of structure, the purpose of the document is to effectively communicate the game designer's vision for the game in terms of the mechanics, dynamics and aesthetics of gameplay. The information should be chunked into clearly defined and logical sections, which are easy to understand yet provide sufficient detail to inform the work of the cross-disciplinary team (artists, programmers, team leaders etc.)

"In broad terms, the purpose of documentation is to communicate the vision in sufficient detail to implement it. It removes the awkwardness of programmers, designers and artists coming to the producers and designers and asking what they should be doing. It keeps them from programming or animating in a box, with no knowledge of how or if their work is applicable or integrates with the work of others. Thus, it reduces wasted efforts and confusion."  - Ryan 1999
				

Resources

Resource 1. Google Drive GDD Template (editable)

  • Download this GDD Template that I've created and use the template guide in the 'Assessment Resources' area of Moodle to help you populate it
  • Upload the document to YOUR OWN Google docs workspace and get accustomed to working in this environment
  • You are encouraged to customise the visual aesthetic ('look and feel') of my GDD to suit your own tastes
  • Once uploaded, it is editable anywhere, anytime and a link can be provided to your tutor (or me) for feedback as your GDD develops

Link: Google Drive (editable GDD)

Resource 2. Student Exemplar GDDs

Below you will find a hyperlink to an archive containing four examples of student GDDs from 2015. Although the format, structure and software methodology is different to that for 2017, they are indicative of the standard required to achieve a high grade.

Link: Student examples

Resource 3. Gantt Chart Template (editable)

  • Download the DGTL12009 Game Development Dashboard that I've created and customise the Gantt Chart component to reflect your team's proposed development timeframe
  • Gantt Charts are industry standard project management tools which ensure milestones and key deliverables are produced in accordance within a scheduled timeframe
  • The Gantt Chart is used in conjunction with your GDD and provides team members and stakeholders visibility over the progress of your project. This allows your team to quickly identify issues and mitigate risks before they derail your project
  • You MUST include a link to your completed Game Development Dashboard from within your GDD

Link: Google Drive (DGTL12009 Game Development Dashboard)

2. Development Blog (Weeks 5-7): Individual Task

Mode: Individual task

Objective: Maintain a weekly development blog covering Week 5-7

Style: Informal writing (not academic), short video or audio

Constraints:

  • Use the supplied Moodle blog tool
  • Create 1x blog post each week critically reflecting on your involvement in the team game development process
  • Blog does NOT need to be written, video or audio responses are acceptable
  • There is no minimum word length, but your blog posts should be of sufficient length to cover your topic

Task

Create 1x blog post each week critically reflecting on your involvement in the team game development process.

Weekly Blog Topics:

  • Week 5 - free choice
  • Week 6 - free choice
  • Week 7 - critically reflect on your role in the development of the GDD (i.e. how have you contributed?)

Free-choice Blog suggestions

  • Relevance of your weekly tasks to game design theory
  • Things that have inspired or motivated you (e.g. games, movies, books, tv, ideas)
  • Challenges that you have encountered (i.e. which areas have proved the most difficult?)
  • Problems that have arisen, and how you overcame them
  • Research & development (i.e. what have you done to expand your knowledge of game development?)
  • Examples of content that you are producing in support of the game
  • Team dynamics
  • Game development progress

Assessment Due Date Week 7 Friday (01-Sep-2017) 11:45 PM AEST
Return Date to Students Week 9 Friday (15-Sep-2017)
Weighting 30%
Assessment Criteria

The assessment criteria for Assignment 2 are summarised below:

  • Game Design Document (GDD) & Gantt Chart - Team Task:
    • Deliver a complete GDD, based upon the supplied document template
    • Deliver a complete Gantt Chart for your team game (use the supplied Game Development Dashboard, or create your own Gantt Chart)
    • The GDD and Gantt Chart must accurately reflect the technical design and proposed implementation for your team's digital game
    • Both deliverables are required to meet the submission criteria
  • Development Blog (Weeks 5-7) - Individual Task:
    • Individual Task
    • Complete one entry per week during Weeks 5-7 using the individual Game Development Blog on the course Moodle site (located in the 'Assessment' block in the left-hand menu)
    • Drawing from the designated topics, students are to individually create 1x blog post each week critically reflecting on your involvement in the team game development process
    • There is no word limit for the blog posts, but they must sufficiently cover the topic
    • Blog posts can be delivered in written, video or audio format
    • Refer to the course Moodle site for specific information about the expectations for your journal
  • Allocation of marks:
    • Game Design Document (GDD) & Gantt Chart - 25 marks
    • Development Blog (Weeks 5-7) - 5 marks
  • Supplementary Notes:
    • All media components developed for the finished game must be original (with the exception of code / scripts that are in the public domain)
    • Any public domain code that you employ MUST be referenced correctly
    • You must not use someone else's Intellectual Property (IP) within your work e.g. Star Wars is George Lucas' idea, not yours. Ergo, all components, or spin-offs from this universe, are also dependent on his IP
    • Evidence of successful experimentation and innovation will result in higher marks
    • Penalties will be applied for late submission, or failing to comply with assessment requirements
    • Please refer to the DGTL12009 Moodle site for more detailed assessment criteria

Referencing Style Harvard (author-date)
Submission Online
Group submission

Learning Outcomes Assessed
This section can be expanded to view the assessed learning outcomes

2. develop a game prototype, applying the theories, methods and process of game design

4. communicate game designs to others using appropriate documentation.

Graduate Attributes
This section can be expanded to view the assessed graduate attributes

1. Communication

2. Problem Solving

3. Critical Thinking

4. Information Literacy

5. Team Work

6. Information Technology Competence

7. Cross Cultural Competence

8. Ethical practice



3 Practical and Written Assessment

Assessment Title Published Game, Marketing Strategy & Individual Development Blog (Weeks 8-11)
Task Description

Assignment 3: Published Game, Marketing Strategy and Development Blog (Weeks 8-11)

Synopsis

This assessment task contains three components:

1. Published game (link to hosted platform and source files)

2. Marketing Strategy & Game Facebook page

3. Development Blog (Weeks 8-11)

1. Published Game: Team Task

Mode: Team task

Objective: Deploy your completed game to a specific online game publishing portal so that your game is publicly accessible

Constraints:

  • Stated portals must be used for game deployment
  • Game must be open to the public
  • Full source-code and project files must be uploaded as a ZIP file through this page

Game Publishing Portals

Select the appropriate publishing portal for your game engine:

a. Construct: Scirra Arcade or Kongregate

b. Unity: Kongregate

c. Twine: Upload to Philome.la (free Twine game hosting) and then submit to the Interactive Fiction Database

2. Marketing Strategy (Max 500 words) & Game Facebook Page: Team Task

Mode: Team task

Objective: Develop a Marketing Strategy (Max 500 words) with a supporting Facebook page for your game

Constraints:

  • Team Marketing Strategy is to be delivered as a Microsoft Word document labelled Team_MarketingStrategy.doc (insert your team name where it says 'Team')
  • Document is to be no more than 500 words
  • Link to game Facebook page MUST be included within your team marketing document

Task

There is no point building the world's best game if nobody knows about it. Now is the time to unleash your marketing strategy! Describe the proposed marketing strategy for your finished game.

Consider the following:

  • Who is your target audience?
  • How will you target them?
  • What channels will you use to spread your message?
  • What evidence have you found to support this approach?
  • How will you use your game Facebook page?

3. Development Blog (Weeks 8-11): Individual Task

Mode: Individual task

Objective: Maintain a weekly development blog covering Weeks 8-11

Style: Informal writing (not academic), short video or audio

Constraints:

  • Use the supplied Moodle blog tool
  • Create 1x blog post each week critically reflecting on your involvement in the team game development process
  • Blog does NOT need to be written, video or audio responses are acceptable
  • There is no minimum word length, but your blog posts should be of sufficient length to cover your topic

Task

Create 1x blog post each week critically reflecting on your involvement in the team game development process.

Weekly Blog Topics:

  • Week 8 - free choice
  • Week 9 - free choice
  • Week 10 - critically reflect on the deployment of your team game (i.e. alpha/beta testing; how did you apply audience feedback; publishing)
  • Week 11 – critically reflect on the implementation of the marketing strategy & the Facebook page (i.e. how have you contributed, and how effective is it?)

Free-choice Blog suggestions

  • Relevance of your weekly tasks to game design theory
  • Things that have inspired or motivated you (e.g. games, movies, books, tv, ideas)
  • Challenges that you have encountered (i.e. which areas have proved the most difficult?)
  • Problems that have arisen, and how you overcame them
  • Research & development (i.e. what have you done to expand your knowledge of game development?)
  • Examples of content that you are producing in support of the game
  • Team dynamics
  • Game development progress
  • Have you received any public feedback? Has it been supportive, or have comments relating to bugs or potential features/improvements been given?
  • Are you going to push development of your game further in the future? If so, how?
Assessment Due Date Week 12 Friday (06-Oct-2017) 11:45 PM AEST
Return Date to Students Exam Week Friday (20-Oct-2017)
Weighting 40%
Assessment Criteria

The assessment criteria for Assignment 3 are summarised below:

  • Published Game - Team Task:
    • Team Task
    • Completed game must be fully functional, playtested and 'complete' in accordance with the GDD (i.e. as per Assignment 2)
    • Completed game must be published and uploaded to the relevant game portal as specified in the assessment brief
    • Uploaded game, where possible, must be open to public feedback
    • Complete source files for the completed game and a link to the uploaded portal must be provided as part of the submission
  • Marketing Strategy (Max 500 words) & Game Facebook Page - Team Task:
    • Team Task
    • Marketing Strategy must successfully address the brief criteria
    • Game Facebook page must be linked to the live and open to the public
  • Development Blog (Weeks 8-11) - Individual Task:
    • Individual Task
    • Complete one entry per week during Weeks 8-11 using the individual Game Development Blog on the course Moodle site (located in the 'Assessment' block in the left-hand menu)
    • Drawing from the designated topics, students are to individually create 1x blog post each week critically reflecting on your involvement in the team game development process
    • There is no word limit for the blog posts, but they must sufficiently cover the topic
    • Blog posts can be delivered in written, video or audio format
    • Refer to the course Moodle site for specific information about the expectations for your journal
  • Allocation of marks:
    • Published Game - 24 marks
    • Marketing Strategy & Game Facebook Page - 10 Marks
    • Development Blog (Weeks 8-11) - 6 marks
  • Supplementary Notes:
    • All media components developed for the finished game must be original (with the exception of code / scripts that are in the public domain)
    • Any public domain code that you employ MUST be referenced correctly
    • You must not use someone else's Intellectual Property (IP) within your work e.g. Star Wars is George Lucas' idea, not yours. Ergo, all components, or spin-offs from this universe, are also dependent on his IP
    • Evidence of successful experimentation and innovation will result in higher marks
    • Penalties will be applied for late submission, or failing to comply with assessment requirements
    • Please refer to the DGTL12009 Moodle site for more detailed assessment criteria
Referencing Style Harvard (author-date)
Submission Online
Group submission

Learning Outcomes Assessed
This section can be expanded to view the assessed learning outcomes

2. develop a game prototype, applying the theories, methods and process of game design

3. playtest a game prototype, evaluate feedback, and revise a game’s design

4. communicate game designs to others using appropriate documentation.

Graduate Attributes
This section can be expanded to view the assessed graduate attributes

1. Communication

2. Problem Solving

3. Critical Thinking

4. Information Literacy

5. Team Work

6. Information Technology Competence

7. Cross Cultural Competence

8. Ethical practice




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