OCCT12006 - Understanding the Environment
Term 1 - 2017


All details in this unit profile for OCCT12006 have been officially approved by CQUniversity and represent a learning partnership between the University and you (our student). The information will not be changed unless absolutely necessary and any change will be clearly indicated by an approved correction included in the profile.

Overview

This unit introduces students to the fundamental importance of the environment and its influence on occupational participation. Students will build on foundational knowledge of occupational therapy ecological models in order to understand the role of the physical, social, cultural and temporal environment in occupational performance. Students will obtain knowledge of theories and evidence-based practice behind the provision of environmental modifications and the application of the occupational therapy process in assessing for, prescribing and evaluating environmental modifications. Practical learning opportunities reflecting contemporary occupational therapy practice will be built into this unit.

Details

Career Level Undergraduate
Unit Level Level 2
Credit Points 6
Student Contribution Band 2
Fraction of Full-Time Student Load 0.125

Pre-requisites or Co-requisites

Prerequisites:-

Students must have successfully completed all units of year 1 of the Bachelor of Occupational Therapy (Hons) course.

Residential Schools

This unit has a Compulsory Residential School for distance mode students and the details are:
Click here to see your Residential School Timetable.

Attendance Requirements

All on-campus students are expected to attend scheduled classes – in some units, these classes are identified as a mandatory (pass/fail) component and attendance is compulsory. International students, on a student visa, must maintain a full time study load and meet both attendance and academic progress requirements in each study period (satisfactory attendance for International students is defined as maintaining at least an 80% attendance record).

Offerings

Term 1 - 2017
  • Bundaberg
  • Rockhampton

Website

This unit has a website, within the Moodle system, which is available two weeks before the start of term. It is important that you visit your Moodle site throughout the term. Go to Moodle

Recommended Student Time Commitment

Each 6-credit Undergraduate unit at CQUniversity requires an overall time commitment of an average of 12.5 hours of study per week, making a total of 150 hours for the unit.

Class Timetable

Assessment Overview

Assessment Task Weighting
1. Presentation 25%
2. Written Assessment 50%
3. Practical Assessment 25%

This is a graded unit: your overall grade will be calculated from the marks or grades for each assessment task, based on the relative weightings shown in the table above. You must obtain an overall mark for the unit of at least 50%, or an overall grade of ‘pass’ in order to pass the unit. If any ‘pass/fail’ tasks are shown in the table above they must also be completed successfully (‘pass’ grade). You must also meet any minimum mark requirements specified for a particular assessment task, as detailed in the ‘assessment task’ section (note that in some instances, the minimum mark for a task may be greater than 50%). Consult the University’s Grades and Results Procedures for more details of interim results and final grades.

All University policies are available on the IMPortal.

You may wish to view these policies:

  • Grades and Results Procedure
  • Assessment Policy and Procedure (Higher Education Coursework)
  • Review of Grade Procedure
  • Academic Misconduct Procedure
  • Monitoring Academic Progress (MAP) Policy and Procedure – Domestic Students
  • Monitoring Academic Progress (MAP) Policy and Procedure – International Students
  • Refund and Excess Payments (Credit Balances) Policy and Procedure
  • Student Feedback – Compliments and Complaints Policy and Procedure
  • Acceptable Use of Information and Communications Technology Facilities and Devices Policy and Procedure

This list is not an exhaustive list of all University policies. The full list of University policies are available on the IMPortal.

Feedback, Recommendations and Responses

Every unit is reviewed for enhancement each year. At the most recent review, the following staff and student feedback items were identified and recommendations were made.

Feedback Source Recommendation
The splinting intensive and practical workshops were valued by the students. Moodle, in-class feedback and survey following the splinting intensive The splinting intensive will remain in this course as a valued learning activity, supporting students to meet learning outcomes. Practical sessions on daily living aids and mobility devices will also continue in 2017.
On successful completion of this unit, you will be able to:
  1. Describe the role of the environment in understanding occupational performance
  2. Apply professional reasoning skills in the selection of environmental modifications for a variety of client presentations across the lifespan
  3. Develop intervention plans for clients presenting with a range of conditions that may require environmental intervention strategies based on contemporary evidence from the literature
  4. Design and construct a non-commercially available assistive device for a client with specific requirements.
  5. Utilise web-based and other product information sources to ensure contemporary knowledge of the field of environmental modifications, rehabilitation appliances, daily living aids and assistive technology.


Alignment of Assessment Tasks to Learning Outcomes

Assessment Tasks Learning Outcomes
1 2 3 4 5
1 - Presentation    
2 - Written Assessment      
3 - Practical Assessment

Alignment of Graduate Attributes to Learning Outcomes

  • Introductory Level
  • Intermediate Level
  • Graduate Level
Graduate Attributes Learning Outcomes
1 2 3 4 5
1. Communication
2. Problem Solving
3. Critical Thinking
4. Information Literacy  
5. Team Work      
6. Information Technology Competence        
7. Cross Cultural Competence
8. Ethical practice

Alignment of Assessment Tasks to Graduate Attributes

  • Introductory Level
  • Intermediate Level
  • Graduate Level
Assessment Tasks Graduate Attributes
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
1 - Presentation  
2 - Written Assessment        
3 - Practical Assessment

Prescribed Textbooks

Willard & Spackman's occupational therapy
Author/s: Boyt Schell, B.A., Gillen, G. & Scaffa, M.E. Year: 2014
Edition: twelfth edition Publisher: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
City: Baltimore State: Maryland
Country: United States of America
View textbooks at the CQUniversity Bookshop
Note:

It is expected that students will already own a copy of this required text from their first year of studies in Occupational Therapy.

Additional readings will be from evidence-based peer-reviewed literature, and Course Resources Online.

IT Resources

You will need access to the following IT resources:
  • Internet
  • CQUniversity Student Email
  • Unit Website (Moodle)
All submissions for this unit must use the American Psychological Association (APA) referencing style (details can be obtained here). For further information, see the Assessment Tasks below.
Unit CoordinatorDesley Simpson (desley.simpson@cqu.edu.au)
Note: Check the Term-Specific section for any additional contact information provided by the teaching team
Week Begin Date Module/Topic Chapter Events and Submissions
Week 1 06-03-2017

Introduction to Understanding the Environment

Reading One

Chapter 38. Ecological Models in Occupational Therapy. In Schell, B.A., Gillen, G., & Scaffa, M.E. (Eds.). (2014). Willard and Spackman’s Occupational Therapy, 12th Edition. Philadelphia: Lippincott Williams and Wilkins

Reading Two

Marshall, A., Myers, C. & Pierce, D. (2017). Centennial topics - A century of therapeutic use of the physical environment. American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 71, doi: 10.5014/ajot.2017.023960

Week 2 13-03-2017 Introduction to orthotics

Reading One

e-book reading

Chapter 33. Orthotics for occupational outcomes. In Curtin, M., Molineux, M. & Supyk, J-A. (Eds). Occupational Therapy and Physical Dysfunction: Enabling Occupation (6th Edition). St Louis: Churchill Livingstone.

Reading Two

Chapter 63. A woodworker’s hand injury. Pp.946-961. In Schell, B.A., Gillen, G., & Scaffa, M.E. (Eds.). (2014). Willard and Spackman’s Occupational Therapy, 12th Edition. Philadelphia: Lippincott Williams and Wilkins.

Reading Three

Robinson, L., Brown, T., & O'Brien, L. (2016). Embracing an occupational perspective: Occupation-based interventions in hand therapy practice. Australian Occupational Therapy Journal, 63, 293-296. doi: 10.1111/1440-1630/12268

Week 3 20-03-2017 Assistive technology & Universal design

Reading One

Chapter 29. Modifying Performance Contexts. pp.364-381. In Schell, B.A., Gillen, G., & Scaffa, M.E. (Eds.). (2014). Willard and Spackman’s Occupational Therapy, 12th Edition. Philadelphia: Lippincott Williams and Wilkins.

Reading Two

Steel, E.J. & Layton, N.A. (2016). Assistive technology in Australia: Integrating theory and evidence into action. Australian Occupational Therapy Journal, 63, 381-390. doi: 10.1111/1440-1630.122293.


Reading Three

Imrie, R. & Luck, R. (2014). Designing inclusive environments: Rehabilitating the body and the relevance of universal design. Disability and Rehabilitation, 36, 16, 1315-1319. doi: 10.3109/09638288.2014.936191

A range of commercially-available assistive technology will be available to explore at ROK campus and BDG campus during tutorial time. Students to complete tutorial worksheets throughout the session.

Week 4 27-03-2017 Community participation and the environment

Reading One

Unsworth, C. (2012). Editorial. Community mobility promotes participation for people of all ages and abilities. Australian Occupational Therapy Journal, 59, 1, doi: 10.1111/j.1440-1630.2011.00994.x

Reading Two

Hoyle, M., Ryan, C. & Gustafsson, L. (2016). Exploring the meaning of community for older Australians. Australian Occupational Therapy Journal, 63, 86-94. doi: 10.1111/1440-1630.12251

Reading Three

Di Stefano, M., Stuckey, R., & Lovell, R. (2012). Promotion of safe communty mobility: Challenges and opportunities for occupational therapy practice. Australian Occupational Therapy Journal, 59, 98-102. doi: 10.1111/j.1440-1630.2011.0093.x
Week 5 03-04-2017

Access to the environment - focus on mobility aids

Reading One

Karmarkar, A.M., Dicianno, B.E., Graham, J.E., Cooper, R., Kelleher, A. & Cooper, R.A. (2012). Factors associated with provision of wheelchairs in older adults. Assistive Technology, 24, 155-167. doi: 1080/10400435.2012.659795.

Reading Two

Koontz, A.M., Brindle, E.D., Kankipati, P., Feathers, D. & Cooper, R.A. (2010). Design features that affect the maneuverability of wheelchairs and scooters. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 91, 759-764.

Vacation Week 10-04-2017
Week 6 17-04-2017 Presentations for Assessment 1
Presentations for Assessment 1
Presentation 25% Due Tuesday (18 Apr 17) 08:00 AM AEST
Week 7 24-04-2017

Anzac Day Public Holiday

Anzac Day Public Holiday
Week 8 01-05-2017

The home environment - occupational therapy home assessment for those with chronic disease, older adults with changing needs and persons with a functional impairment

Reading One

CRO

Chapter 8. Measuring the Person and the Home Environment. (pp.139-169). In Ainsworth, E., & De Jonge, D. (2011). An occupational therapist's guide to home modification practice. Thorofare, NJ: Slack.

Reading Two

Sim, S., Barr, C.J., & George, S. (2015). Comparison of equipment prescriptions in the toilet/bathroom by occupational therapists using home visits and digital photos, for patients in rehabilitation. Australian Occupational Therapy Journal, 62, 132-140. doi: 10.1111/1440-1630.12121

Week 9 08-05-2017 The home environment - occupational therapy interventions for those with chronic disease, older adults with changing needs and persons with a functional impairment

Reading One

CRO

pp.174-179 of Chapter 9. Drawing the Built Environment. In Ainsworth, E., & De Jonge, D. (2011). An occupational therapist's guide to home modification practice. Thorofare, NJ: Slack.

Reading Two

Aplin, T., de Jonge, D., & Gustafsson, L. (2013). Understanding the dimensions of home that impact on home modification decision-making. Australian Occupational Therapy Journal, 60, 101-109. doi:. 10.1111/144-1630.12022

A range of wheelchairs will be made available during the tutorial time at both ROK and BDG campus. Students to complete tutorial worksheets throughout the session.

Week 10 15-05-2017 Environmental considerations for those with chronic disease or specific functional impairments

Reading One

Chapter 64. Providing Occupational Therapy for Older Adults with Changing Needs. In Schell, B.A., Gillen, G., & Scaffa, M.E. (Eds). (2014). Willard and Spackman’s Occupational Therapy, 12th edition. Philadelphia: Lippincott Williams and Wilkins.

Reading Two

Ekelman, B.A. Hooke, L.,Davis, A., Klan, J., Newburn, D., Detwiler, K. & Ricchino, N. (2014). Occupational therapy interventions for adults with rheumatoid arthritis: An appraisal of the evidence. Occupational Therapy in Health Care,28(4):347–361. doi: 10.3109/07380577.2014.919687


Week 11 22-05-2017 Hand therapy specialist guest lecture and tutorial Preparation readings as provided by specialist guest lecturer
Week 12 29-05-2017

Splinting practical and assessment

Splinting practical and assessment

Practical Assessment 25% Due AEST
Review/Exam Week 05-06-2017
Written Assessment 50% Due Friday (09 Jun 17) 05:00 PM AEST
Exam Week 12-06-2017

1 Presentation

Assessment Title Presentation 25%
Task Description

This presentation assessment is a companion assessment to the practical assessment during the splinting intensive and develops your knowledge in exploring and understanding how assistive technology supports occupation. You are required to prepare and deliver a 15-minute in-class presentation to your peers. Students may be paired or grouped for this assessment by the course coordinator, depending on numbers of enrolments. In week one, you will be given a brief case study description which in the professional/clinical setting could be all the information you will receive in a referral to an occupational therapy outpatient setting. You will take that information and develop a presentation which will cover the following elements:

  • A description of the person and the condition they present with (1 slide)
  • Identify the model you have chosen to influence your OT process for this person and condition (1 slide)
  • Identify the assessment/s you would use and explain why (1-2 slides)
  • A narrative occupational profile (summarised in 1-2 paragraphs) (1 slide) – as this slide is an occupational profile, it is acceptable for it to contain more words than you would normally enclose on a powerpoint slide
  • The goals you set for this client (1-2 slides)
  • A description of the barriers in the environment that are presently limiting your client’s occupational performance & participation (resulting from their impairment/condition) (2-4 slides)
  • Detail the interventions to the environment you would prescribe (consider design aspects, modifications to place/social/physical, assistive technology – including hard and soft technologies, low and high-tech). These must be appropriate for your client (3-5 slides)
  • Share which hand splint you believe to be the most appropriate static splint for your client (1 slide)
  • Detail why this static splint was chosen, the goals of splinting & the rationale for orthotic design (1-2 slides)

The number of slides nominated here are a guideline only to help you structure your presentation. It is important that you remain as close as possible to the 15-minute mark, and structure your presentation to fulfil that requirement. Presenting material in a concise way is a skill you will require when providing in-services in the clinical/professional setting.

You are not required to prepare an additional handout for this assessment. You are not required to supply your notes used in addition to the power-point presentation. Please supply a PDF handout version of your slides to the course coordinator by no later than 8am on the morning of the presentation assessment. That resource will then be made available to your classmates via Moodle, as the content in your presentation is a peer learning opportunity.

Assessment Due Date Week 6 Tuesday (18-Apr-2017) 08:00 AM AEST
Week 6. Allocated times for student presentations will be posted in Moodle before Break Week. All students are required to attend the entire presentation session/s.
Return Date to Students Week 8 Friday (05-May-2017)
Weighting 25%
Assessment Criteria

The complete assessment rubric will be made available to you in the PDF Course Profile document at the commencement of term.

The assessment criteria and standards that will guide this assessment task are as follows:

  • Presentation Content, Structure and Organisation

  • Presentation Style

  • Use of Technology and Materials

Conditions Minimum mark or grade - Students must receive 50% and over of the overall available marks in order to pass this assessment piece.
Referencing Style American Psychological Association (APA)
Submission Hard copy

Please PDF your Powerpoint and submit via email to the Course Coordinator on the morning of the Presentation prior to lectures commencing

Learning Outcomes Assessed
This section can be expanded to view the assessed learning outcomes

1. Describe the role of the environment in understanding occupational performance

2. Apply professional reasoning skills in the selection of environmental modifications for a variety of client presentations across the lifespan

3. Develop intervention plans for clients presenting with a range of conditions that may require environmental intervention strategies based on contemporary evidence from the literature

Graduate Attributes
This section can be expanded to view the assessed graduate attributes

1. Communication

2. Problem Solving

3. Critical Thinking

4. Information Literacy

6. Information Technology Competence

7. Cross Cultural Competence

8. Ethical practice



2 Written Assessment

Assessment Title Written Assessment 50%
Task Description

This assessment requires you to bring together the concepts you have learned throughout term and present a written assessment to demonstrate your understanding of the range of environmental interventions that occupational therapists would provide to a client living with chronic disease and age-related functional decline. In week one, you will be presented with a detailed written case study of an older client. This case study will also be discussed in class during week one. You will compile a written assessment not less than 2,200 words and not more than 2,500 words, responding to the section questions below. This word count does not include figures, tables and appendices that you may choose to include in your assessment. The lectures and tutorials throughout term will support your ability to undertake and complete this written assessment.

You written assessment will be guided by the following questions. It is acceptable for you to use section headings to structure your written assessment. The guiding questions are as follows:

1) Summarise the impacts on body functions/structure, activity and participation that occur in an older client with this chronic disease presentation and age-related functional decline

2) Nominate the occupation-focused assessments and client factor assessments (e.g. range of motion, manual muscle testing) that are suitable for this particular functional presentation?

3) Consider the functional presentation and the client/family aims as presented in the case study, as well as what you would expect to learn from the assessments, and identify up to three SMART goals for this client. These will inform your interventions.

4) What assistive technology and education/training would you prescribe to optimise this client's ongoing occupational participation and engagement and provide your reasoning for this.

5) Nominate the environmental modifications you believe are appropriate based on this client's aims and functional presentation. Provide your reasoning.

6) Compile basic technical drawings of any home modifications for this client. These are the technical drawings that you would submit to the builders in order for this client's home to be modified.

Assessment Due Date Review/Exam Week Friday (09-Jun-2017) 05:00 PM AEST
Return Date to Students Exam Week Friday (16-Jun-2017)
Weighting 50%
Assessment Criteria

A summary of the assessment criteria is as follows, with full rubrics available to you in week 1 of term:

  • evidence of research into the diagnosis and analysis of impact of condition on body functions and structures, occupational performance and occupational participation
  • understanding of appropriate assessments and outcome measures and ability to articulate their applicability to this diagnostic presentation
  • understanding of the physical/social/cultural barriers in a client's environment and development of client-centred goals to manage those to enhance occupational performance and participation
  • selection of assistive equipment/adaptive devices and education/information on appropriate techniques based on available evidence and client-centred goals
  • selection of environmental modifications to the home based on available evidence and client-centred goals. Technical drawing skills adequately convey the goals of the OT intervention
  • written communication skills

Conditions Minimum mark or grade - Students must receive 50% and over of the overall available marks in order to pass this assessment piece.
Referencing Style American Psychological Association (APA)
Submission Online

Learning Outcomes Assessed
This section can be expanded to view the assessed learning outcomes

2. Apply professional reasoning skills in the selection of environmental modifications for a variety of client presentations across the lifespan

4. Design and construct a non-commercially available assistive device for a client with specific requirements.

Graduate Attributes
This section can be expanded to view the assessed graduate attributes

1. Communication

2. Problem Solving

3. Critical Thinking

8. Ethical practice



3 Practical Assessment

Assessment Title Practical Assessment 25%
Task Description

This assessment requires you to design and construct a static thermoplastic splint which will be allocated to you in a random allocation. Throughout the splinting intensive in week 12, you will have substantial opportunity to work with a variety of thermoplastic materials and fabricate a number of common splints (e.g. thumb spica, resting pan, wrist cock-up) prior to fabricating your assessment piece. You will already have some knowledge of suitable splints from the lecture content and your presentation assessment in week 6 and then again in week 11. Prior to undertaking your design and construction, our visiting splinting specialist will be providing you with additional theory on the properties and applications of various thermoplastic materials, strapping materials and the accessories used in splinting. You will be marked on your splint on the second day of your intensive.

Assessment Due Date This splinting intensive will be conducted across week 12 on Bundaberg campus Monday and Tuesday (a.m.) then Rockhampton campus Wednesday and Thursday (a.m.)
Return Date to Students Review/Exam Week Friday (09-Jun-2017)
Weighting 25%
Assessment Criteria

The marking rubric will be made available to you in week 1 of term and discussed during class in week 1.

A summary of the assessment criteria is as follows:

  • demonstration of professional reasoning
  • management of materials
  • technical design of splint
  • construction and fabrication skills
  • reflection skills

Conditions Minimum mark or grade - Students must receive 50% and over of the overall available marks in order to pass this assessment piece.
Referencing Style American Psychological Association (APA)
Submission Hard copy

You will be assessed on the day of the practical. Moderation will occur between academic staff and the splinting consultant supporting this teaching experience.

Learning Outcomes Assessed
This section can be expanded to view the assessed learning outcomes

1. Describe the role of the environment in understanding occupational performance

2. Apply professional reasoning skills in the selection of environmental modifications for a variety of client presentations across the lifespan

3. Develop intervention plans for clients presenting with a range of conditions that may require environmental intervention strategies based on contemporary evidence from the literature

4. Design and construct a non-commercially available assistive device for a client with specific requirements.

5. Utilise web-based and other product information sources to ensure contemporary knowledge of the field of environmental modifications, rehabilitation appliances, daily living aids and assistive technology.

Graduate Attributes
This section can be expanded to view the assessed graduate attributes

1. Communication

2. Problem Solving

3. Critical Thinking

4. Information Literacy

5. Team Work

6. Information Technology Competence

7. Cross Cultural Competence

8. Ethical practice




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