LITR19052 - The Modern Novel
Term 1 - 2017


All details in this unit profile for LITR19052 have been officially approved by CQUniversity and represent a learning partnership between the University and you (our student). The information will not be changed unless absolutely necessary and any change will be clearly indicated by an approved correction included in the profile.

Overview

This unit invites students to explore a selection of novels by a number of significant writers from the twentieth century and from a range of national literatures. These novels address a range of issues including post-colonialism, the transition from the psyche to psychology, sexuality, the American Jazz age, Southern post-bellum agonistics, gender, magic realism, existentialism, slavery, racism, the holocaust and identity. The unit also charts the passage from modernism to post-modernism.

Details

Career Level Undergraduate
Unit Level Level 3
Credit Points 6
Student Contribution Band 1
Fraction of Full-Time Student Load 0.125

Pre-requisites or Co-requisites

Nil

Attendance Requirements

All on-campus students are expected to attend scheduled classes – in some units, these classes are identified as a mandatory (pass/fail) component and attendance is compulsory. International students, on a student visa, must maintain a full time study load and meet both attendance and academic progress requirements in each study period (satisfactory attendance for International students is defined as maintaining at least an 80% attendance record).

Offerings

Term 1 - 2017
  • Distance

Website

This unit has a website, within the Moodle system, which is available two weeks before the start of term. It is important that you visit your Moodle site throughout the term. Go to Moodle

Recommended Student Time Commitment

Each 6-credit Undergraduate unit at CQUniversity requires an overall time commitment of an average of 12.5 hours of study per week, making a total of 150 hours for the unit.

Class Timetable

Assessment Overview

Assessment Task Weighting
1. Written Assessment 20%
2. Written Assessment 40%
3. Written Assessment 40%

This is a graded unit: your overall grade will be calculated from the marks or grades for each assessment task, based on the relative weightings shown in the table above. You must obtain an overall mark for the unit of at least 50%, or an overall grade of ‘pass’ in order to pass the unit. If any ‘pass/fail’ tasks are shown in the table above they must also be completed successfully (‘pass’ grade). You must also meet any minimum mark requirements specified for a particular assessment task, as detailed in the ‘assessment task’ section (note that in some instances, the minimum mark for a task may be greater than 50%). Consult the University’s Grades and Results Procedures for more details of interim results and final grades.

All University policies are available on the IMPortal.

You may wish to view these policies:

  • Grades and Results Procedure
  • Assessment Policy and Procedure (Higher Education Coursework)
  • Review of Grade Procedure
  • Academic Misconduct Procedure
  • Monitoring Academic Progress (MAP) Policy and Procedure – Domestic Students
  • Monitoring Academic Progress (MAP) Policy and Procedure – International Students
  • Refund and Excess Payments (Credit Balances) Policy and Procedure
  • Student Feedback – Compliments and Complaints Policy and Procedure
  • Acceptable Use of Information and Communications Technology Facilities and Devices Policy and Procedure

This list is not an exhaustive list of all University policies. The full list of University policies are available on the IMPortal.

Feedback, Recommendations and Responses

Every unit is reviewed for enhancement each year. At the most recent review, the following staff and student feedback items were identified and recommendations were made.

Feedback Source Recommendation
The Moodle course site is well laid out and easy to navigate. The course work progresses logically and builds on knowledge from week to week. Each week we are provided with links to the best resources for learning. The assessment tasks provide a good learning experience throughout the term. My lecturer John Fitzsimmons has contributed greatly to my success in this course. John's approach to mentoring students is supportive and inclusive. It is these two things which helped me to continue in this course and complete it when I experienced difficulty. I would have otherwise disengaged from the course, missed out on the learning experience and lagged behind in my degree. Lastly, John provides feedback which is targeted and prompts me to reflect further on the task. Feedback is quite substantial at times and I enjoy gaining additional information on a writer, perspective or idea which I may not have considered. Student Feedback Continue with the course.
On successful completion of this unit, you will be able to:
  1. analyse and compare selected modern novels within a framework of issues such as ideology, gender, race and the politics of literature;
  2. articulate the evolution of the novel from socio/moral/expressive realism through modernism and post-modernism; and,
  3. interpret, analyse and evaluate complex literary texts.

Alignment of Assessment Tasks to Learning Outcomes

Assessment Tasks Learning Outcomes
1 2 3
1 - Written Assessment
2 - Written Assessment
3 - Written Assessment

Alignment of Graduate Attributes to Learning Outcomes

  • Introductory Level
  • Intermediate Level
  • Graduate Level
Graduate Attributes Learning Outcomes
1 2 3
1. Communication
2. Problem Solving  
3. Critical Thinking
4. Information Literacy    
5. Team Work      
6. Information Technology Competence      
7. Cross Cultural Competence    
8. Ethical practice  

Alignment of Assessment Tasks to Graduate Attributes

  • Introductory Level
  • Intermediate Level
  • Graduate Level
Assessment Tasks Graduate Attributes
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
1 - Written Assessment          
2 - Written Assessment  
3 - Written Assessment      

Textbook Information

There are no required textbooks. Note:

Students will need to have access to the set novels:

Wk 1 Introduction
Wk 2 Joseph Conrad: Heart of darkness (1899)
Wk 3 Thomas Mann: Death in Venice (1912)
Wk 4 F Scott Fitzgerald: The great Gatsby (1925)
Wk 5 Ernest Hemingway: The sun also rises (1926)
Wk 6 Virginia Woolf: To the lighthouse (1927)
Wk 7 William Faulkner: As I lay dying (1930)
Wk 8 Albert Camus: The outsider (1942)
Wk 9 Sylvia Plath: The bell jar (1963)
Wk 10 Gabriel Garcia Marquez: 100 years of Solitude (1967)
Wk 11 Margaret Atwood: The Handmaid’s tale (1985)
Wk 12 Toni Morrison: Beloved (1987)

IT Resources

You will need access to the following IT resources:
  • CQUniversity Student Email
  • Internet
  • Unit Website (Moodle)
All submissions for this unit must use the Harvard (author-date) referencing style (details can be obtained here). For further information, see the Assessment Tasks below.
Unit CoordinatorAnn-Marie Priest (a.priest@cqu.edu.au)
Note: Check the Term-Specific section for any additional contact information provided by the teaching team
Week Begin Date Module/Topic Chapter Events and Submissions
Week 1 06-03-2017

Introduction: The Modern Novel

Week 2 13-03-2017

Joseph Conrad - Heart of Darkness (1899)

Week 3 20-03-2017

Thomas Mann – Death in Venice (1912)

Week 4 27-03-2017 F Scott Fitzgerald – The Great Gatsby (1925)
Book Review Due Friday (31 Mar 17) 11:45 PM AEST
Week 5 03-04-2017

Ernest Hemingway - The sun also rises (1927)

Vacation Week 10-04-2017
Week 6 17-04-2017

Virginia Woolf – To the Lighthouse (1927)

Week 7 24-04-2017

William Faulkner – As I Lay Dying (1930)

Week 8 01-05-2017

Albert Camus - The Outsider (1942)

Essay Due Friday (05 May 17) 11:45 PM AEST
Week 9 08-05-2017

Sylvia Plath – The Bell Jar (1963)

Week 10 15-05-2017

Gabriel Garcia Marquez – 100 Years of Solitude (1967)

Week 11 22-05-2017

Margaret Atwood – The Handmaid’s Tale (1985)

Week 12 29-05-2017

Toni Morrison – Beloved (1987)

Essay Due Friday (02 Jun 17) 11:45 PM AEST
Review/Exam Week 05-06-2017
Exam Week 12-06-2017

1 Written Assessment

Assessment Title Book Review
Task Description

Weighting: 20%

Length: 1000 words (+/- 10%)

Details

You are required to choose one novel from the unit (preferably one of those studied in the first four weeks, so that you will have the benefit of the unit materials to help you) and write a Book Review of that novel. Your Book Review should be based on your own close reading of the novel, and should cover the following points:

  • A brief description of the book
  • A brief discussion of the book’s historical, social and/or literary context
  • An analysis of the book’s main themes
  • An evaluation of the book’s significance: is it an important work of literature? If so, why? If not, why not?

You may want to model your review on the kind of book reviews you can find in literary newspapers and journals. For example, look at the Review section of the Weekend Australian, or the weekend supplements to The Age or the Sydney Morning Herald. You may also want to look for exemplars in Australian Book Review, the Sydney Review of Books, the New York Review of Books or the Times Literary Supplement.

Be selective in the exemplars you choose. Do not model your review on the kinds of reviews you might find on the GoodReads or Amazon.com websites. These reviews tend to be solely focused on whether the book is enjoyable to read or not; in your review, you will be thinking much more broadly about the strengths and weaknesses of the book and its contribution to literary culture. A marked-up exemplar is provided on the unit’s Moodle website.

Note that you will be expected not only to read your selected novel and develop your own ideas about its themes and significance but also to do some further research about the history of the book and the way it has been viewed by other readers and critics. For instance, in developing your analysis of the novel, you may want to look at what other critics have seen as its strengths and weaknesses. Acknowledge your research in your review using in-text referencing, and include a reference list using the Harvard (Author-Date) style. Only two or three sources are needed.

Please note: the novel you choose for this assignment cannot be chosen again for assignments 2 and 3. Each assignment must deal with different novels.

Assessment Due Date Week 4 Friday (31-Mar-2017) 11:45 PM AEST
Return Date to Students Week 6 Friday (21-Apr-2017)
Weighting 20%
Assessment Criteria

This assignment will be evaluated on the following criteria:

  1. Identification and analysis of the novel’s main themes, supported by scholarly literature
  2. Understanding of the novel’s historical and social context, based on research
  3. Cogent evaluation of the work’s significance
  4. Appropriate acknowledgement of all sources using the Harvard (author-date) style
  5. Clear and effective writing, with correct grammar, spelling and punctuation
Referencing Style Harvard (author-date)
Submission Online

Learning Outcomes Assessed
This section can be expanded to view the assessed learning outcomes

1. analyse and compare selected modern novels within a framework of issues such as ideology, gender, race and the politics of literature;

2. articulate the evolution of the novel from socio/moral/expressive realism through modernism and post-modernism; and,

3. interpret, analyse and evaluate complex literary texts.

Graduate Attributes
This section can be expanded to view the assessed graduate attributes

1. Communication

2. Problem Solving

3. Critical Thinking



2 Written Assessment

Assessment Title Essay
Task Description

Weighting: 40%
Word length: 1500-2000 words
Task:

Choose a question from one of the discussion questions listed on the Moodle website for one of the set novels and write a 1500-2000 word response in essay format. Please note: the novel you choose for this assignment cannot be the same novel you choose for assignments 1 or 3. Each assignment must deal with different novels.

The essay must include both in-depth analysis of your chosen novel and references to a range of scholarly sources (minimum of 5). Note that all references need to be academic (i.e. peer-reviewed journal articles and/or scholarly books) and obtained using the Library's databases and/or resources. Wiki and other non-scholarly references from the Internet will not be accepted.

A guide to analysing a novel and using academic sources in your essay is provided on the unit’s Moodle website.

Assessment Due Date Week 8 Friday (05-May-2017) 11:45 PM AEST
Return Date to Students Week 10 Friday (19-May-2017)
Weighting 40%
Assessment Criteria

This assignment will be evaluated using the following assessment criteria:

  1. Development of a convincing and coherent argument in response to the question
  2. The relevance, insight and depth of analysis of the chosen novel, supported by paraphrases and quotations from the text
  3. Effective use of a range of academic sources (minimum of 5) to support both argument and analysis
  4. Clear and effective writing, with correct grammar, spelling and punctuation
  5. Appropriate acknowledgement of all sources using the Harvard (author-date) referencing style.
Referencing Style Harvard (author-date)
Submission Online

Learning Outcomes Assessed
This section can be expanded to view the assessed learning outcomes

1. analyse and compare selected modern novels within a framework of issues such as ideology, gender, race and the politics of literature;

2. articulate the evolution of the novel from socio/moral/expressive realism through modernism and post-modernism; and,

3. interpret, analyse and evaluate complex literary texts.

Graduate Attributes
This section can be expanded to view the assessed graduate attributes

1. Communication

2. Problem Solving

3. Critical Thinking

4. Information Literacy

6. Information Technology Competence

7. Cross Cultural Competence

8. Ethical practice



3 Written Assessment

Assessment Title Essay
Task Description

Weighting: 40%

Length: 2000 words (+/- 10%)

Write an essay answering ONE of the following questions (note: in answering this question, students should not use novels discussed in Assessment Items 1 & 2):

  1. Gender and sexuality are key issues explored in many modern novels, sometimes transgressively so. Choose at least two of the set texts and explore the ways in which they deal with gender and sexuality, making sure that you include a strong theoretical foundation for your observations.

  2. Modern literature uses a variety of narrative techniques and multiple points of view to generate a complex portrait of the human psyche. Discuss with reference to at least two of the set texts.
  3. The modern novel challenges, plays with and even rewrites official versions of history, bringing to light perspectives, experiences and points of view that might otherwise remain hidden. Discuss with reference to at least two of the set texts.

The essay must include both in-depth analysis of your chosen novels and references to a range of scholarly sources (minimum of 6). Please note that all references need to be academic (i.e. peer-reviewed journal articles and/or scholarly books) and obtained using the Library's databases and/or resources. Wiki and other non-scholarly references from the Internet will not be accepted.

A guide to analysing a novel and using academic sources in your essay is provided on the unit’s Moodle website.


Assessment Due Date Week 12 Friday (02-Jun-2017) 11:45 PM AEST
Return Date to Students Essays will be returned as soon as practicable after the end of term.
Weighting 40%
Assessment Criteria

This assignment will be marked using the following evaluation criteria:

  1. Development of a convincing and coherent argument in response to the question
  2. Engagement with key concepts relating to the modern novel
  3. The relevance, insight and depth of analysis of the chosen novels, supported by paraphrases and quotations from the texts
  4. Effective use of a range of academic sources (minimum of 6) to support both argument and analysis
  5. Clear and effective writing, with correct grammar, spelling and punctuation
  6. Appropriate acknowledgement of all sources using the Harvard (author-date) referencing style.
Referencing Style Harvard (author-date)
Submission Online

Learning Outcomes Assessed
This section can be expanded to view the assessed learning outcomes

1. analyse and compare selected modern novels within a framework of issues such as ideology, gender, race and the politics of literature;

2. articulate the evolution of the novel from socio/moral/expressive realism through modernism and post-modernism; and,

3. interpret, analyse and evaluate complex literary texts.

Graduate Attributes
This section can be expanded to view the assessed graduate attributes

1. Communication

2. Problem Solving

3. Critical Thinking

4. Information Literacy

8. Ethical practice




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