ZOOL12009 - Invertebrate Zoology
Term 1 - 2017


All details in this unit profile for ZOOL12009 have been officially approved by CQUniversity and represent a learning partnership between the University and you (our student). The information will not be changed unless absolutely necessary and any change will be clearly indicated by an approved correction included in the profile.

Overview

The invertebrates are the largest and most diverse group of animals on Earth, being found in all environments and habitats. This unit provides an overview of the biology, ecology, and taxonomy of the various invertebrate phyla, linking adaptation and evolutionary history to understand the origins and proliferation of this great diversity of life.

Details

Career Level Undergraduate
Unit Level Level 2
Credit Points 6
Student Contribution Band 7A
Fraction of Full-Time Student Load 0.125

Pre-requisites or Co-requisites

ZOOL11005 Foundation Animal Biology or BIOL11099 Living Systems

Residential Schools

This unit has a Compulsory Residential School for distance mode students and the details are:
Click here to see your Residential School Timetable.

Attendance Requirements

All on-campus students are expected to attend scheduled classes – in some units, these classes are identified as a mandatory (pass/fail) component and attendance is compulsory. International students, on a student visa, must maintain a full time study load and meet both attendance and academic progress requirements in each study period (satisfactory attendance for International students is defined as maintaining at least an 80% attendance record).

Offerings

Term 1 - 2017
  • Mixed Mode
  • Rockhampton

Website

This unit has a website, within the Moodle system, which is available two weeks before the start of term. It is important that you visit your Moodle site throughout the term. Go to Moodle

Recommended Student Time Commitment

Each 6-credit Undergraduate unit at CQUniversity requires an overall time commitment of an average of 12.5 hours of study per week, making a total of 150 hours for the unit.

Class Timetable

Assessment Overview

Assessment Task Weighting
1. Written Assessment 20%
2. Practical Assessment 30%
3. Examination 50%

This is a graded unit: your overall grade will be calculated from the marks or grades for each assessment task, based on the relative weightings shown in the table above. You must obtain an overall mark for the unit of at least 50%, or an overall grade of ‘pass’ in order to pass the unit. If any ‘pass/fail’ tasks are shown in the table above they must also be completed successfully (‘pass’ grade). You must also meet any minimum mark requirements specified for a particular assessment task, as detailed in the ‘assessment task’ section (note that in some instances, the minimum mark for a task may be greater than 50%). Consult the University’s Grades and Results Procedures for more details of interim results and final grades.

All University policies are available on the IMPortal.

You may wish to view these policies:

  • Grades and Results Procedure
  • Assessment Policy and Procedure (Higher Education Coursework)
  • Review of Grade Procedure
  • Academic Misconduct Procedure
  • Monitoring Academic Progress (MAP) Policy and Procedure – Domestic Students
  • Monitoring Academic Progress (MAP) Policy and Procedure – International Students
  • Refund and Excess Payments (Credit Balances) Policy and Procedure
  • Student Feedback – Compliments and Complaints Policy and Procedure
  • Acceptable Use of Information and Communications Technology Facilities and Devices Policy and Procedure

This list is not an exhaustive list of all University policies. The full list of University policies are available on the IMPortal.

Feedback, Recommendations and Responses

Every unit is reviewed for enhancement each year. At the most recent review, the following staff and student feedback items were identified and recommendations were made.

Feedback Source Recommendation
Release the whole term content instead of week by week. other students liked the weekly release of lectures. Student feedback IN the future we could provide the study guides for all weeks upfront but release the lectures week by week to allow for time relevant announcements and feedback.
A few students were unsatisfied by the lack of a "revision sheet" for the examination Student feedback One past exam and a revision lecture and notes was provided. This along with the study notes gives good revision material. Additional past exam material could be made available.
Residential school should relate back to lecture content more Student feedback Include an additional residential school activity for collected specimens across all projects to be classified by each team. Purchase some good identification guides for students to use at the residential school. Also providing the arthropod lectures in advance of the res school to help those students carrying out insect related projects.
More support for the lecturer during the residential school Student feedback Involve RHD students in Residential school to gain experience and provide extra assistance
On successful completion of this unit, you will be able to:
  1. Define terminology associated with the study of invertebrate zoology
  2. Describe the structural and functional organisation of animals from the various invertebrate phyla in written and verbal form
  3. Explain the evolutionary history of the invertebrates, including their adaptations to particular environments and their ecology
  4. Identify the major invertebrate taxa and explain, in wirtten and verbal form, the evolutionary and physiological basis for the taxonomic classification of these animals
  5. Acquire practical skills in the study of invertebrates by conducting basic scientific research on invertebrate abundaunce, distribution, behaviour, and ecology in both field and laboratory settings

Alignment of Assessment Tasks to Learning Outcomes

Assessment Tasks Learning Outcomes
1 2 3 4 5
1 - Written Assessment    
2 - Practical Assessment
3 - Examination  

Alignment of Graduate Attributes to Learning Outcomes

  • Introductory Level
  • Intermediate Level
  • Graduate Level
Graduate Attributes Learning Outcomes
1 2 3 4 5
1. Communication
2. Problem Solving  
3. Critical Thinking
4. Information Literacy
5. Team Work  
6. Information Technology Competence  
7. Cross Cultural Competence        
8. Ethical practice      

Alignment of Assessment Tasks to Graduate Attributes

  • Introductory Level
  • Intermediate Level
  • Graduate Level
Assessment Tasks Graduate Attributes
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
1 - Written Assessment  
2 - Practical Assessment  
3 - Examination    

Textbook Information

There are no required textbooks.

IT Resources

You will need access to the following IT resources:
  • Internet
  • CQUniversity Student Email
  • Unit Website (Moodle)
All submissions for this unit must use the Harvard (author-date) referencing style (details can be obtained here). For further information, see the Assessment Tasks below.
Unit CoordinatorGeeta Gautam Kafle (g.gautamkafle@cqu.edu.au)
Note: Check the Term-Specific section for any additional contact information provided by the teaching team
Week Begin Date Module/Topic Chapter Events and Submissions
Week 1 06-03-2017

1. Course overview

2. Why study invertebrates

Week 2 13-03-2017

3. Invertebrates and the environment

4. Taxonomy and Evolution of invertebrates

Week 3 20-03-2017

5. Protozoa

6. Porifera

Week 4 27-03-2017

7. Cnidarians

8. How to build a coral reef in 4 easy steps

Week 5 03-04-2017

9. Platyhelminthes

10. Worms and Coelomes

Vacation Week 10-04-2017
Week 6 17-04-2017

11. Annelida

12. Mollusca part 1

Written Assessment Due Tuesday (18 Apr 17) 11:45 PM AEST
Week 7 24-04-2017

13. Mollusca part 2

14. Attack of the Cephalopods! (aka Mollusca part 3)

Week 8 01-05-2017

No lectures to accommodate residential school

Residential School 5 -7 May 2017.

Week 9 08-05-2017

15. Arthropoda part 1

16. Arthropoda part 2

Week 10 15-05-2017

17. Greetings, fellow Crustaceans! (aka Arthropoda part 3)

18. Things just got weird (aka Lophophorates)

Week 11 22-05-2017

19. Echinodermata

20. Hemichordates

Week 12 29-05-2017

21. How you're related to a spineless blob (aka Chordates)

22. Course review

Practical Assessment Due Friday (02 Jun 17) 05:00 PM AEST
Review/Exam Week 05-06-2017
Exam Week 12-06-2017

1 Written Assessment

Assessment Title Written Assessment
Task Description

Assessment Aim

The aim of this assessment is to apply some of your knowledge from the lectures, encourage you to research a topic in more detail and hone your writing skills to be concise.

Assessment Description

This written assignment for this course comprises a 1000 word essay.

“Lower invertebrates”, so called because they generally appeared early in the history of life on Earth, provide many benefits to humans (e.g. medical applications, food and resources, understanding how life on Earth ‘works’, etc.), as well as many detriments (infections, parasites, food spoilage, etc.). Your task is to summarize how a lower invertebrate (as an individual species or a higher taxonomic level) contributes to the benefit or detriment of human populations.

You are free to choose any invertebrate/outcome/field of research that interests you, but ensure your topic is based on a ‘lower’ invertebrate (i.e. invertebrates up to and including Platyhelminthes, or flatworms, on the invertebrate tree of life. This includes groups such as the protozoans, poriferans, cnidarians, nematodes, platyhelminths and nemerteans and will be described in detail in lectures.)



Assessment Due Date Week 6 Tuesday (18-Apr-2017) 11:45 PM AEST
Return Date to Students Week 8 Monday (01-May-2017)
Weighting 20%
Assessment Criteria

The written assessment will be marked against the following criteria:

1. The overall clarity of the essay with respect to structure and presentation (including figures and tables), grammar and spelling.

2. The extent to which the essay demonstrates research of the topic outside of the lecture content.

3. Appropriate acknowledgment of sources in the text and accurate representation in the reference list, using the Harvard referencing style.

4. Demonstration of distilling/summarizing abilities (ability to stick to the 1000 word limit).

Conditions Minimum mark or grade - 30%
Referencing Style Harvard (author-date)
Submission Online

via Moodle rtf.,doc,docx accepted

Learning Outcomes Assessed
This section can be expanded to view the assessed learning outcomes

1. Define terminology associated with the study of invertebrate zoology

2. Describe the structural and functional organisation of animals from the various invertebrate phyla in written and verbal form

3. Explain the evolutionary history of the invertebrates, including their adaptations to particular environments and their ecology

Graduate Attributes
This section can be expanded to view the assessed graduate attributes

1. Communication

2. Problem Solving

3. Critical Thinking

4. Information Literacy

6. Information Technology Competence

7. Cross Cultural Competence

8. Ethical practice



2 Practical Assessment

Assessment Title Practical Assessment
Task Description

The practical assessment is a written report and oral presentation based on the project completed during the residential school. As such attendance at the Residential School is mandatory.

Written report

  • Prepared in the format of a scientific journal article (a template will be provided).
  • Prepared either as an individual or in a group.
  • Maximum of 1500 words
  • Minimum of 10 references.

Oral presentation
  • Final day of residential school in Rockhampton
  • 8-10 powerpoint slides.
  • Maximum of 10 minutes plus 5 minutes question time.
  • Presented as a group.

Assessment Due Date Week 12 Friday (02-Jun-2017) 05:00 PM AEST
Return Date to Students Review/Exam Week Friday (09-Jun-2017)
Weighting 30%
Assessment Criteria

The assessment will be marked on specific criteria relating to the oral presentation and report:

Written report:

  • Abstract (clear, concise summary of context, hypothesis, results and conclusions)
  • Introduction (Relevant context provided, starting with a broad focus of observations and models and narrowing to a clear, well-articulated hypothesis for a manipulative experiment)
  • Methods (adequate description and justification of methods used so experiment could be repeated)
  • Results (Concise description of results, ordered logically and presented in graphs/tables, as well as basic statistical analyses)
  • Discussion (Logical structure that discusses the key results and their meaning before placing results in a broader context and identifying biases/improvements/further fields of study etc)
  • References (cited appropriately throughout text, 10 minimum, no web pages unless data repository-type)
  • Spelling & grammar
  • Word count (keeping to guidelines in each section).

Oral presentation:

  • Questions: Are questions and criticisms of the research project adequately considered and answered? Are the speakers able to place their results in a broader context to explain their significance? Do the speakers recognize possible improvements to the experimental design, including new ideas that have emerged while doing the research?
  • Style: Do the speakers present the research clearly and confidently, demonstrating a sound grasp of the hypothesis and reasoning behind the methodology? Do the speakers present the research at an appropriate pace and keep on time? Do the speakers make good eye contact and engage with the audience?
  • Content: Are the slides clearly presented, logically ordered, well organized and pleasing to the eye? Do the slides present all the relevant information needed to understand the research project, including the reason(s) for doing the experiment, and any conclusions?

Conditions Minimum mark or grade - 40%
Referencing Style Harvard (author-date)
Submission Hard copy

Learning Outcomes Assessed
This section can be expanded to view the assessed learning outcomes

1. Define terminology associated with the study of invertebrate zoology

2. Describe the structural and functional organisation of animals from the various invertebrate phyla in written and verbal form

3. Explain the evolutionary history of the invertebrates, including their adaptations to particular environments and their ecology

4. Identify the major invertebrate taxa and explain, in wirtten and verbal form, the evolutionary and physiological basis for the taxonomic classification of these animals

5. Acquire practical skills in the study of invertebrates by conducting basic scientific research on invertebrate abundaunce, distribution, behaviour, and ecology in both field and laboratory settings

Graduate Attributes
This section can be expanded to view the assessed graduate attributes

1. Communication

2. Problem Solving

3. Critical Thinking

4. Information Literacy

5. Team Work

7. Cross Cultural Competence

8. Ethical practice



Examination

Outline Complete an examination
Date During the University examination period
Weighting 50%
Condition Minimum percentage of examination marks required to pass course - 45
Length 180 minutes
Details Dictionary - non-electronic, concise, direct translation only (dictionary must not contain any notes or comments).
No Calculators Permitted
Closed Book
Learning Outcomes Assessed
This section can be expanded to view the assessed learning outcomes

1. Define terminology associated with the study of invertebrate zoology

2. Describe the structural and functional organisation of animals from the various invertebrate phyla in written and verbal form

3. Explain the evolutionary history of the invertebrates, including their adaptations to particular environments and their ecology

4. Identify the major invertebrate taxa and explain, in wirtten and verbal form, the evolutionary and physiological basis for the taxonomic classification of these animals

Graduate Attributes
This section can be expanded to view the assessed graduate attributes

1. Communication

2. Problem Solving

3. Critical Thinking

4. Information Literacy

7. Cross Cultural Competence

8. Ethical practice


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