MMST12019 - 3D Animation
Term 1 - 2017


All details in this unit profile for MMST12019 have been officially approved by CQUniversity and represent a learning partnership between the University and you (our student). The information will not be changed unless absolutely necessary and any change will be clearly indicated by an approved correction included in the profile.

Overview

3D graphics are an important element of many films, television programs, games and other digital media projects. This unit provides a practical introduction to 3D modelling and animation. Students learn key concepts associated with 3D space and time, along with skills in modelling, lighting, shading, animation and rendering with 3D graphics software. Together these topics provide a holistic practical and theoretical understanding of the 3D production process. This unit requires access to a computer with a 3D graphics card, an Internet connection and audio capabilities.

Details

Career Level Undergraduate
Unit Level Level 2
Credit Points 6
Student Contribution Band 1
Fraction of Full-Time Student Load 0.125

Pre-requisites or Co-requisites

Prerequisite: DGTL11001

Attendance Requirements

All on-campus students are expected to attend scheduled classes – in some units, these classes are identified as a mandatory (pass/fail) component and attendance is compulsory. International students, on a student visa, must maintain a full time study load and meet both attendance and academic progress requirements in each study period (satisfactory attendance for International students is defined as maintaining at least an 80% attendance record).

Offerings

Term 1 - 2017
  • Brisbane
  • Distance
  • Mackay
  • Rockhampton
  • Sydney

Website

This unit has a website, within the Moodle system, which is available two weeks before the start of term. It is important that you visit your Moodle site throughout the term. Go to Moodle

Recommended Student Time Commitment

Each 6-credit Undergraduate unit at CQUniversity requires an overall time commitment of an average of 12.5 hours of study per week, making a total of 150 hours for the unit.

Class Timetable

Assessment Overview

Assessment Task Weighting
1. Practical and Written Assessment 45%
2. Practical and Written Assessment 55%

This is a graded unit: your overall grade will be calculated from the marks or grades for each assessment task, based on the relative weightings shown in the table above. You must obtain an overall mark for the unit of at least 50%, or an overall grade of ‘pass’ in order to pass the unit. If any ‘pass/fail’ tasks are shown in the table above they must also be completed successfully (‘pass’ grade). You must also meet any minimum mark requirements specified for a particular assessment task, as detailed in the ‘assessment task’ section (note that in some instances, the minimum mark for a task may be greater than 50%). Consult the University’s Grades and Results Procedures for more details of interim results and final grades.

All University policies are available on the IMPortal.

You may wish to view these policies:

  • Grades and Results Procedure
  • Assessment Policy and Procedure (Higher Education Coursework)
  • Review of Grade Procedure
  • Academic Misconduct Procedure
  • Monitoring Academic Progress (MAP) Policy and Procedure – Domestic Students
  • Monitoring Academic Progress (MAP) Policy and Procedure – International Students
  • Refund and Excess Payments (Credit Balances) Policy and Procedure
  • Student Feedback – Compliments and Complaints Policy and Procedure
  • Acceptable Use of Information and Communications Technology Facilities and Devices Policy and Procedure

This list is not an exhaustive list of all University policies. The full list of University policies are available on the IMPortal.

Feedback, Recommendations and Responses

Every unit is reviewed for enhancement each year. At the most recent review, the following staff and student feedback items were identified and recommendations were made.

Feedback Source Recommendation
Students appreciate being able to license a free copy of the Maya software for installation on their personal computers. Moodle Continue to use Maya software in this course.
Students appreciate the logical structure of the course. Moodle Maintain the logical structure of this course.
The video tutorials need to be updated to match the latest version of the Maya software so that study time is not wasted working around differences in the newer version of the software. Moodle Update the video tutorials to demonstrate the latest version of Maya.
If it is not feasible for the course coordinator to update the video tutorials every time a new version of Maya is released, students should be given access to an alternative library of up-to-date video tutorials. Moodle Explore the possibility of subscribing to a library of video tutorials such as Lynda.com for students.
On successful completion of this unit, you will be able to:
  1. understand the computer animation process and associated elements, knowledge and history;
  2. understand basic concepts associated with 3D computer graphics such as axes, planes, coordinate systems and views as well as geometrical primitives;
  3. demonstrate competence operating with industry-standard 3D graphics software;
  4. create, combine and manipulate 3D objects such as primitives, lights and cameras to develop complex models and scenes;
  5. use polygon modelling techniques to create 3D character models;
  6. use NURBS modelling and subdivision techniques to create 3D complex and organic models;
  7. create virtual lighting effects within a 3D scene;
  8. use virtual cameras to create shots and to control how an audience views a 3D scene;
  9. create and apply shading materials to objects within a 3D scene;
  10. create keyframe animations, path animations to move around objects, cameras, lights, etc in a 3D scene;
  11. plan, design and establish scenes for short 3D animation pieces such as TV commercials or TV news titles.
  12. render 3D scenes to different types of output files matching different broadcasting standards

Alignment of Assessment Tasks to Learning Outcomes

Assessment Tasks Learning Outcomes
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
1 - Practical and Written Assessment      
2 - Practical and Written Assessment

Alignment of Graduate Attributes to Learning Outcomes

  • Introductory Level
  • Intermediate Level
  • Graduate Level
Graduate Attributes Learning Outcomes
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
1. Communication      
2. Problem Solving
3. Critical Thinking
4. Information Literacy
5. Team Work      
6. Information Technology Competence
7. Cross Cultural Competence          
8. Ethical practice              

Alignment of Assessment Tasks to Graduate Attributes

  • Introductory Level
  • Intermediate Level
  • Graduate Level
Assessment Tasks Graduate Attributes
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
1 - Practical and Written Assessment    
2 - Practical and Written Assessment

Textbook Information

There are no required textbooks.

IT Resources

You will need access to the following IT resources:
  • Maya 2014 above
  • CQUniversity Student Email
  • Internet
  • Unit Website (Moodle)
  • Adobe Photoshop CS6 above
  • Adobe Premiere 1.5 above
All submissions for this unit must use the Harvard (author-date) referencing style (details can be obtained here). For further information, see the Assessment Tasks below.
Unit CoordinatorQing Huang (q.huang@cqu.edu.au)
Note: Check the Term-Specific section for any additional contact information provided by the teaching team
Week Begin Date Module/Topic Chapter Events and Submissions
Week 1 06-03-2017

Introduction to 3D animation Interface overview

Interface/preference/project settings

Week 2 13-03-2017

The Interface in depth

Exploring and understanding the Maya Interface/hotbox/operations

Week 3 20-03-2017

NURBS modelling: curves & surface

Creating and editing NURBS curves and surfaces

Week 4 27-03-2017

Polygon modelling: tools

Creating/editing polygons

Week 5 03-04-2017

Polygon modelling: mapping

Mapping/editing texture on polygons

Vacation Week 10-04-2017
Week 6 17-04-2017

Material basics: concepts and tools

Applying materials and textures. Creating shades

A polygon character head and written critique - Friday of Week 6

A polygon head & report Due Friday (21 Apr 17) 11:45 PM AEST
Week 7 24-04-2017

Lights

Creating/editing lights and effects
Week 8 01-05-2017

Cameras

Creating/editing cameras and effects

Week 9 08-05-2017

Animation basics: traditions, concepts, deformers

Creating/editing Keyframe/path animations

Week 10 15-05-2017

Rendering: engines, setting, and delivery

Options, settings, effects, batch rendering

Week 11 22-05-2017

A little extra: Particles and Painting effects.

Creating/Editing particle effects and paint effects.

Week 12 29-05-2017

Review

3D animation commercial and written critique - Friday of Week 12

3D animation commercial and written critique Due Friday (02 Jun 17) 11:45 PM AEST
Review/Exam Week 05-06-2017
Exam Week 12-06-2017

1 Practical and Written Assessment

Assessment Title A polygon head & report
Task Description

Produce a polygon model of a human or humanoid character head and write a 500-word report.

Please refer to the course web site for the detailed assessment criteria.

Assessment Due Date Week 6 Friday (21-Apr-2017) 11:45 PM AEST
Return Date to Students Week 8 Friday (05-May-2017)
Weighting 45%
Assessment Criteria

Please refer to the course web site for the detailed assessment criteria.

Referencing Style Harvard (author-date)
Submission Online

Go to the course website on Moodle and follow the instruction on the Assessment Submission section.

Learning Outcomes Assessed
This section can be expanded to view the assessed learning outcomes

1. understand the computer animation process and associated elements, knowledge and history;

2. understand basic concepts associated with 3D computer graphics such as axes, planes, coordinate systems and views as well as geometrical primitives;

3. demonstrate competence operating with industry-standard 3D graphics software;

4. create, combine and manipulate 3D objects such as primitives, lights and cameras to develop complex models and scenes;

5. use polygon modelling techniques to create 3D character models;

7. create virtual lighting effects within a 3D scene;

8. use virtual cameras to create shots and to control how an audience views a 3D scene;

9. create and apply shading materials to objects within a 3D scene;

12. render 3D scenes to different types of output files matching different broadcasting standards

Graduate Attributes
This section can be expanded to view the assessed graduate attributes

1. Communication

2. Problem Solving

3. Critical Thinking

4. Information Literacy

6. Information Technology Competence

7. Cross Cultural Competence



2 Practical and Written Assessment

Assessment Title 3D animation commercial and written critique
Task Description

Create a short 3D animation commercial project by using the knowledge you have learned from the course. Present a 500 word essay that explains the project design choice, process and self-evaluation.

Please refer to the course web site for the detailed assessment criteria.

 

 

Assessment Due Date Week 12 Friday (02-Jun-2017) 11:45 PM AEST
Return Date to Students Exam Week Friday (16-Jun-2017)
Weighting 55%
Assessment Criteria

Please refer to the course web site for the detailed assessment criteria.

Referencing Style Harvard (author-date)
Submission Online
Hard copy

If the file size of your animation video is too large, you could also submit the assignment offline by burning a DVD disc that includes all your working and video files as well as the written critique.

Learning Outcomes Assessed
This section can be expanded to view the assessed learning outcomes

1. understand the computer animation process and associated elements, knowledge and history;

2. understand basic concepts associated with 3D computer graphics such as axes, planes, coordinate systems and views as well as geometrical primitives;

3. demonstrate competence operating with industry-standard 3D graphics software;

4. create, combine and manipulate 3D objects such as primitives, lights and cameras to develop complex models and scenes;

5. use polygon modelling techniques to create 3D character models;

6. use NURBS modelling and subdivision techniques to create 3D complex and organic models;

7. create virtual lighting effects within a 3D scene;

8. use virtual cameras to create shots and to control how an audience views a 3D scene;

9. create and apply shading materials to objects within a 3D scene;

10. create keyframe animations, path animations to move around objects, cameras, lights, etc in a 3D scene;

11. plan, design and establish scenes for short 3D animation pieces such as TV commercials or TV news titles.

12. render 3D scenes to different types of output files matching different broadcasting standards

Graduate Attributes
This section can be expanded to view the assessed graduate attributes

1. Communication

2. Problem Solving

3. Critical Thinking

4. Information Literacy

5. Team Work

6. Information Technology Competence

7. Cross Cultural Competence

8. Ethical practice




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