BMSC13009 - Immunology
Term 1 - 2017


All details in this unit profile for BMSC13009 have been officially approved by CQUniversity and represent a learning partnership between the University and you (our student). The information will not be changed unless absolutely necessary and any change will be clearly indicated by an approved correction included in the profile.

Overview

The study of Immunology introduces the student to pre-natal and post-natal development of the human immune system and its function in health and disease states, this includes autoimmune disorders, hypersensitivity reactions and microbiological infections. Students will also learn about the diagnostic uses of antibodies, vaccine design and preventive and therapeutic uses of vaccines.

Details

Career Level Undergraduate
Unit Level Level 3
Credit Points 6
Student Contribution Band 3
Fraction of Full-Time Student Load 0.125

Pre-requisites or Co-requisites

Prerequisite

BMSC12010 Clinical Biochemistry

or

BMED19003 Clinical Biochemistry

Residential Schools

This unit has a Compulsory Residential School for distance mode students and the details are:
Click here to see your Residential School Timetable.

Attendance Requirements

All on-campus students are expected to attend scheduled classes – in some units, these classes are identified as a mandatory (pass/fail) component and attendance is compulsory. International students, on a student visa, must maintain a full time study load and meet both attendance and academic progress requirements in each study period (satisfactory attendance for International students is defined as maintaining at least an 80% attendance record).

Offerings

Term 1 - 2017
  • Mixed Mode
  • Rockhampton

Website

This unit has a website, within the Moodle system, which is available two weeks before the start of term. It is important that you visit your Moodle site throughout the term. Go to Moodle

Recommended Student Time Commitment

Each 6-credit Undergraduate unit at CQUniversity requires an overall time commitment of an average of 12.5 hours of study per week, making a total of 150 hours for the unit.

Class Timetable

Assessment Overview

Assessment Task Weighting
1. Practical Assessment 25%
2. Written Assessment 25%
3. Examination 50%

This is a graded unit: your overall grade will be calculated from the marks or grades for each assessment task, based on the relative weightings shown in the table above. You must obtain an overall mark for the unit of at least 50%, or an overall grade of ‘pass’ in order to pass the unit. If any ‘pass/fail’ tasks are shown in the table above they must also be completed successfully (‘pass’ grade). You must also meet any minimum mark requirements specified for a particular assessment task, as detailed in the ‘assessment task’ section (note that in some instances, the minimum mark for a task may be greater than 50%). Consult the University’s Grades and Results Procedures for more details of interim results and final grades.

All University policies are available on the IMPortal.

You may wish to view these policies:

  • Grades and Results Procedure
  • Assessment Policy and Procedure (Higher Education Coursework)
  • Review of Grade Procedure
  • Academic Misconduct Procedure
  • Monitoring Academic Progress (MAP) Policy and Procedure – Domestic Students
  • Monitoring Academic Progress (MAP) Policy and Procedure – International Students
  • Refund and Excess Payments (Credit Balances) Policy and Procedure
  • Student Feedback – Compliments and Complaints Policy and Procedure
  • Acceptable Use of Information and Communications Technology Facilities and Devices Policy and Procedure

This list is not an exhaustive list of all University policies. The full list of University policies are available on the IMPortal.

Feedback, Recommendations and Responses

Every unit is reviewed for enhancement each year. At the most recent review, the following staff and student feedback items were identified and recommendations were made.

Feedback Source Recommendation
Although residential school was presented in a similar format and received mostly well. Students felt that their could have been more activities for them to complete during residential school. Staff assisting also discussed the need for extra activities to be included and discussed ideas of activities that could be implemented. Students and staff Students who have completed required activities may have optional activities available to them. Staff discussed options and other activities that could be included for example are looking at slides of immune cells and lymphoid tissue.
Week-to-week content was discussed at an appropriate level. Students To ensure the depth of discussion of content is not above an appropriate level for this course.
On successful completion of this unit, you will be able to:
  1. List the major cells and tissues of the immune system and state their function in the immune response.
  2. Explain, using examples, the processes of self / non-self-discrimination and disorders that arise as a result of dysfunction in self/non-self-recognition (autoimmunity).
  3. Define, using examples, the terms 'innate' and 'specific' immunity and describe how the non-specific and specific arms of the immune system work together to effect an immune response.
  4. Describe, using examples, the structure and function of antigen recognition molecules.
  5. Define and give examples of the effects of immune 'dysfunction' such as hypersensitivity and immunodeficiency.
  6. Outline the host responses to transplantation and be able to define xenotransplantation and discuss advantages and disadvantages of this process.
  7. Describe, the typical mammalian immune system responses to proteins, bacteria, viruses, protozoa, helminths, fungi and other representative multi-cellular organisms.
  8. Demonstrate competence in the use of primary resource material for experimental and research assignment purposes.

Alignment of Assessment Tasks to Learning Outcomes

Assessment Tasks Learning Outcomes
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
1 - Practical Assessment        
2 - Written Assessment
3 - Examination  

Alignment of Graduate Attributes to Learning Outcomes

  • Introductory Level
  • Intermediate Level
  • Graduate Level
Graduate Attributes Learning Outcomes
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
1. Communication
2. Problem Solving
3. Critical Thinking
4. Information Literacy
5. Team Work                
6. Information Technology Competence              
7. Cross Cultural Competence                
8. Ethical practice                

Alignment of Assessment Tasks to Graduate Attributes

  • Introductory Level
  • Intermediate Level
  • Graduate Level
Assessment Tasks Graduate Attributes
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
1 - Practical Assessment    
2 - Written Assessment      
3 - Examination          

Prescribed Textbooks

Kuby Immunology
Author/s: J.A. Owen, J. Punt, S.A. Stranford Year: 2013
Edition: Seventh edition Publisher: W.H. Freeman and Company
City: New York
Country: United States of America
View textbooks at the CQUniversity Bookshop

IT Resources

You will need access to the following IT resources:
  • CQUniversity Student Email
  • Internet
  • Unit Website (Moodle)
All submissions for this unit must use the Harvard (author-date) referencing style (details can be obtained here). For further information, see the Assessment Tasks below.
Unit CoordinatorAndrew Taylor-Robinson (a.taylor-robinson@cqu.edu.au)
Note: Check the Term-Specific section for any additional contact information provided by the teaching team
Week Begin Date Module/Topic Chapter Events and Submissions
Week 1 06-03-2017

Overview of the immune system - Immunological organs and cells / Innate immunity

Chapters 1, 2, 5

Week 2 13-03-2017

Complement system / Cytokines

Chapters 6, 4

Week 3 20-03-2017

Adaptive immunity B cells /Antibody

Chapters 3, 7, 10, 12, 20

Week 4 27-03-2017

Adaptive immunity - T cells / MHC molecules

Chapters 3, 8, 9, 11

Week 5 03-04-2017

Effector responses / Immune responses

Chapters 13, 14

Vacation Week 10-04-2017
Week 6 17-04-2017

Tolerance, Autoimmunity and Transplantation

Chapter 16

Summary of the innate and adaptive immune systems Due Monday (17 Apr 17) 11:00 PM AEST
Week 7 24-04-2017

Immunodeficiencies / Hypersensitivities

Chapters 18, 15

Week 8 01-05-2017

No lectures - Compulsory residential school held this week

Week 9 08-05-2017

Infectious disease and vaccines

Chapter 17

Week 10 15-05-2017

No lectures - assessment and revision

Week 11 22-05-2017

No lectures - assessment and revision

Journal article Due Wednesday (24 May 17) 11:00 PM AEST
Week 12 29-05-2017

No lectures - assessment and revision

Review/Exam Week 05-06-2017
Exam Week 12-06-2017

1 Practical Assessment

Assessment Title Journal article
Task Description

Using the data generated from the ELISA and Western blot experiments performed at the residential school, students are to write up the results in the format of a scientific paper. The presentation and formatting should adhere to the instructions for authors" (also referred to as "information for authors" or "author info") guidelines set out by the Journal of Immunology. This document can be downloaded from the journal's webpage.

Assessment Due Date Week 11 Wednesday (24-May-2017) 11:00 PM AEST
Return Date to Students Review/Exam Week Wednesday (07-Jun-2017)
Weighting 25%
Assessment Criteria

The formatting and presentation of your assessment piece with be marked against the "instructions for authors" guidelines that are established by the Journal of Immunology, along with the following:

  • Title, Abstract and Keywords - The title should be appropriate (descriptive but not overly lengthy). The abstract should provide a succinct summary of the paper being presented. Keywords should be listed on the cover pages using the instructions outlined by the journal of immunology. 4 marks
  • Introduction - The introduction should orientate the reader with a brief summary of background knowledge surrounding the experiments and also outline the aims and hypothesis. 10 marks
  • Methods - A brief outline of the method performed must be incorporated. The methods should be presented in your own words as it is not sufficient to re-write a step-by-step account from your laboratory manual, nor is it appropriate to write as per lab manual. 8 marks
  • Results - The results should be clear and analyzed where appropriate. Graphs, tables figures should be labelled and have appropriate headings. 8 marks
  • Discussion - Should be appropriate to the experiment being presented and balanced between the analysis of the actual results obtained and their relevance to the discipline of immunology. Note - it is NOT sufficient to provide a discussion that merely states the possible sources of error for the experiment being performed. 10 marks
  • References - You should use appropriate support material(s) to justify the position taken in the paper. References must be presented in accordance with the format outlined by the Journal of Immunology. Primary references will be highly valued, followed by secondary references. It is anticipated that no less than 5 peer review journal articles will be used when preparing this report. 5 marks
  • Structure and quality of the assignment - Does the submission adhere to the format / presentation accepted by the Journal of Immunology as outlined in "instructions for authors"? Language skills (grammar, spelling and sentence structure) and innovation will also be assessed. 5 marks

Total 50 marks

Referencing Style Harvard (author-date)
Submission Online

Learning Outcomes Assessed
This section can be expanded to view the assessed learning outcomes

1. List the major cells and tissues of the immune system and state their function in the immune response.

4. Describe, using examples, the structure and function of antigen recognition molecules.

7. Describe, the typical mammalian immune system responses to proteins, bacteria, viruses, protozoa, helminths, fungi and other representative multi-cellular organisms.

8. Demonstrate competence in the use of primary resource material for experimental and research assignment purposes.

Graduate Attributes
This section can be expanded to view the assessed graduate attributes

1. Communication

2. Problem Solving

3. Critical Thinking

4. Information Literacy

5. Team Work

6. Information Technology Competence



2 Written Assessment

Assessment Title Summary of the innate and adaptive immune systems
Task Description

You are to prepare a two (2) page summary that “Defines, using appropriate examples, the terms "innate" and "specific"
immunity and describe, by way of example, how the non-specific and specific arms of the immune system work together to effect an immune response”

Well written summaries will serve as valuable study tool and will ensure you have a solid understanding of the fundamental content presented in the first half of the semester. Once graded all summaries will be anonymously posted on the course moodle page for other students to view and use as revision material.

Your marks will be derived from the readability of the material, its relevance to the topic and the source of the material(s) that you used to create your topic summary. It is expected peer reviewed references will be utilised in preparing this document and the reference list is not included in the two page limit.

Assessment Due Date Week 6 Monday (17-Apr-2017) 11:00 PM AEST
Return Date to Students Week 8 Monday (01-May-2017)
Weighting 25%
Assessment Criteria

Your assessment will be marked on the following criteria:

  • Relevance to the learning outcome - Does the material "fit" within the guidelines of the learning outcome? Does the summary cover all aspects relating to the selected topic? 10 marks
  • Readability and accessibility of the material - Is the content at an appropriate level for the class to benefit from (not too simple nor to complex)? 5 marks
  • Structure and quality of the assignment - Does it have a well-defined introduction, body and conclusion? Is it an appropriate length (not excessively over nor under the page limit)? Language skills (grammar, spelling and sentence structure) and innovation will also be assessed. 5 marks
  • References - A reference list and appropriate in-text referencing should be included. Note the reference list is not to be included in the page limit. The quality of material(s) used will be considered. It is anticipated that no less than 3 peer review journal articles will be used when preparing this report. 5 marks

Total 25 marks

Referencing Style Harvard (author-date)
Submission Online

Learning Outcomes Assessed
This section can be expanded to view the assessed learning outcomes

1. List the major cells and tissues of the immune system and state their function in the immune response.

2. Explain, using examples, the processes of self / non-self-discrimination and disorders that arise as a result of dysfunction in self/non-self-recognition (autoimmunity).

3. Define, using examples, the terms 'innate' and 'specific' immunity and describe how the non-specific and specific arms of the immune system work together to effect an immune response.

4. Describe, using examples, the structure and function of antigen recognition molecules.

5. Define and give examples of the effects of immune 'dysfunction' such as hypersensitivity and immunodeficiency.

6. Outline the host responses to transplantation and be able to define xenotransplantation and discuss advantages and disadvantages of this process.

7. Describe, the typical mammalian immune system responses to proteins, bacteria, viruses, protozoa, helminths, fungi and other representative multi-cellular organisms.

8. Demonstrate competence in the use of primary resource material for experimental and research assignment purposes.

Graduate Attributes
This section can be expanded to view the assessed graduate attributes

1. Communication

2. Problem Solving

3. Critical Thinking

4. Information Literacy

6. Information Technology Competence



Examination

Outline Complete an examination
Date During the University examination period
Weighting 50%
Condition Minimum percentage of examination marks required to pass course - 40
Length 180 minutes
Details Dictionary - non-electronic, concise, direct translation only (dictionary must not contain any notes or comments).
No Calculators Permitted
Closed Book
Learning Outcomes Assessed
This section can be expanded to view the assessed learning outcomes

1. List the major cells and tissues of the immune system and state their function in the immune response.

2. Explain, using examples, the processes of self / non-self-discrimination and disorders that arise as a result of dysfunction in self/non-self-recognition (autoimmunity).

3. Define, using examples, the terms 'innate' and 'specific' immunity and describe how the non-specific and specific arms of the immune system work together to effect an immune response.

4. Describe, using examples, the structure and function of antigen recognition molecules.

5. Define and give examples of the effects of immune 'dysfunction' such as hypersensitivity and immunodeficiency.

6. Outline the host responses to transplantation and be able to define xenotransplantation and discuss advantages and disadvantages of this process.

7. Describe, the typical mammalian immune system responses to proteins, bacteria, viruses, protozoa, helminths, fungi and other representative multi-cellular organisms.

Graduate Attributes
This section can be expanded to view the assessed graduate attributes

1. Communication

2. Problem Solving

3. Critical Thinking


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